The Real Deal New York

Variance approved for downtown Flushing hotel, office tower

Queens community board gives thumbs up

February 13, 2014 04:55PM

Rendering of 36-18 Main Street in Flushing

Rendering of 36-18 Main Street in Flushing

Community Board 7 has given the green light for a variance to allow a combination hotel and office tower to rise in downtown Flushing, Queens.

The development required 344 parking spots initially, because of the property’s 148-room size. But because of the site’s high water table, Attorney Richard Lobel asked that a reduced number be permitted — a move approved by a council vote of 28 to 2. The site will now hold 305 spots instead.

The board has also asked the developer to undertake a Department of Transportation traffic study, and the Board of Standards and Appeals will have the final say on the zoning change.

Plans for the project, which will consist of one 12-story hotel and a 14-story office tower at 36-18 Main Street in downtown Flushing, also include an office building front on Main Street and an Intercontinental Hotel with underground parking on Prince Street. A two-level spa will be included between the buildings, and shops and a restaurant are also to be located there. [Queens Chronicle]Julie Strickland

  • agenda agenda

    Where the tenant and advocate protests about this hotel? Flushing is getting all the development and it is appreciated because it makes Flushing nicer but that is not the case when something similar is developed in Manhattan’s original but not necessarily the best Chinatown – why is that?

    Two different Chinese banks have decamped to Midtown because they don’t like the neighborhood. Mayor De Blasio HONORED the Flushing community by going to their Chinese New Year parade.

    Flushing acts natural.

    • Victor

      incoherent

      • contrast and compare

        Sorry – forgot to include the link to the Manhattan hotel announcement:

        http://www.boweryboogie.com/2014/02/architect-michael-kang-brings-hotel-125-canal-street/

        I think we should all be happy that local Chinese are able to participate in the development of Chinatown especially with hotels which will mean jobs (Chinatown Manpower has trained workers for hotels in Midtown in the past- union jobs no less) but more importantly, will hand deliver tourists to Chinatown.

        So thank you, Eastbank on bowery, thank you Wyndham, thank you anyone who has sufffered the slings and arrows and upgraded the housing stock and quality of retail in this area which is not keeping up in terms of sophistication and polish in its retail as with the rest of Manhattan.

        Yesterday, there was a two hour wait for Dominique Ansel’s cronuts with plenty (as usual) Chinese people on line willing to pay more than a Chinatown lunch for an upgraded version of a cinnamon roll.

        I know that a lot of businesses didn’t shovel their snow even on Canal Street which makes it dangerous and the Chinese newspapers are reporting that the streets were deserted but a lot of shopkeepers didn’t com in from wherever they actually live. Chinatown has really deteriorated in terms of whether it can pull/deserves tourist traffic or as a destination for must have food. Granted Dominique Ansel is unique but it indicates that businesses thrive because they deserve the patronage not because of retail rent control or government support and certainly not because of a BID which costs landlords but doesn’t in itself MAKE money, get it?

        Dominque Ansel is selling better food than Paris Baguette but at similar price points and in a neighborhood where the rent is ten times higher than wherever Paris Baguettes are located but Paris Baguette has opened more stores and the Chinese community has no problem paying for Paris Baguette (as well as Dominique Ansel from the look of the ethnic makeup of the people in line). I think there is a huge perception problem though if someone like Dominque Ansel were to open up in Chinatown or if even an ethnic Chinese developer tries to do something different – its seen as encroachment not as enrichment of a neighborhood and it invites the usual gentrification complaints.

        Murray HIll WISHES it had Chinatown’s problems.

        • dangerous ground

          Manhattan’s Chinatown is either going to flourish or perish and people who see this as an opportunity to demand government handouts or create a situation where the landlords are getting bashed and forced to pay more than their fair share will not create more jobs and won’t improve retail business.

          If you read Openings and Closings in dnainfo, you will see that Chinese business owners have no problem opening eateries outside of Chinatown and oftentimes it’s not their first branch. But when any business closes, tenants not just Chinese ones take the opportunity to blame the landlord not the fact that business isn’t as good for them as it is for their neighbors who are still in business and paying even more rent. It’s bash landlord day everyday in New York but the quality of the attacks in Chinatown against Chinese owners is unbelievable. I think it is distinct in the level of emotional violence and total disregard of the balanced and equal rights of fellow Chinese on the other side of landlord and tenant issues. It is scandalous and it hasn’t opened up because of the old fashioned courtesy of the “slumlords” who prefer to give face but they do so at their own peril when their efforts are not responded to in kind.

          There’s too much injustice going on behind the scenes that persists only because the perpetrators insist on doing so – not because of any misconduct on the part of the owners. This is NOT happening in Flushing.

          So why is this Twilight Zone – this pocket of behavior that is practiced only within this ever-expanding entity?

        • Please clean your streets.

          You rented a store and you live in Jersey or wherever and you know there is snow coming, you should spend the night inside your store and shovel the snow the next day and the day after or whenever. All you need is heat and a bathroom for you to camp out and protect that street.

          Elderly locals thank the regular snow shovelers. That goodwill should be going to retailers who can enjoy the patronage that comes with it.

  • FlipOutNYC

    HAVE YOU seen the rendering of Sky View Parc phase 2 called The Grand?

    http://www.thegrandsvp.com/contact.htm

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