The Real Deal New York

BOND’s Noah Freedman bashes Trulia on Facebook, Twitter

Claims he was overcharged $15K after buying ad, denied refund

March 14, 2014 05:00PM
By Mark Maurer

trulia-bond

From left: Noah Freedman, Trulia on iPhone and Trulia’s Pete Flint

UPDATE, 11:32 p.m., March 14: Noah Freedman, co-founder of Manhattan-based residential brokerage BOND New York, took to social media today to denounce real estate listings database Trulia.

On both his personal Facebook page and Trulia’s page, Freedman called the site the “worst company I have ever had the displeasure of working with in 15 years in real estate.” He claims that, after signing up to buy an advertisement, the website charged him $15,000 that he said he did not owe, and was subsequently denied a refund.

“I don’t know if i have ever took to social media to rant and rave about a vendor but to any one in real estate I can not urge you strongly enough to stay away from Trulia, the service is the worst you can not get a person on the phone,” Freedman wrote. “Their advertising practices are questionable and they over charged me over 15k for something I never asked for and they will not return my money. It is definitely the worst vendor I have ever worked with, EVER !!! Stay away!!!”

He wrote similar messages on not only his personal Twitter page, but also the official Twitter account of BOND New York. On his account, in an apparent rage, he misspelled Trulia as “Tulia.”

 

 

A spokesperson for Trulia told The Real Deal that the company is working with Freedman to address his complaint.

BOND is one of the largest brokerages in the city, with more than 500 agents and multiple offices. The company announced earlier this year that it would accept the burgeoning online currency Bitcoin as payment for real estate transactions, as previously reported.

15 Responses to “BOND’s Noah Freedman bashes Trulia on Facebook, Twitter”

  1. March 14, 2014 at 5:22 pm, outrage said:

    i will have to agree – trulia is truly a scam

  2. March 14, 2014 at 7:38 pm, Pgallup said:

    Lol. As a former employee at Trulia- I cannot wait until this guy is revealed as being a liar. Trulia is VERY careful about their charges. They record every phone call and the customer agrees to the charges. Trulia is a stand up company from my experience and isn’t a scam. Agents who aren’t happy with Trulia aren’t happy because they don’t reply to their leads fast enough.

    It says right above that he signed up to buy an advertisement!

    • March 16, 2014 at 4:20 pm, Jenn said:

      I don’t know about their charges but it’s by far the worst rental advertisement site… Clients are constantly emailing us on ads that aren’t even ours, phone numbers and names are all mixed up, trulia just doesn’t get it!!

      • March 16, 2014 at 8:59 pm, pgallup said:

        You don’t pay anything for your rental ads though, right?
        Did you know you can call Trulia to have any mistakes corrected? Have you reached out to them?

  3. March 14, 2014 at 10:38 pm, "No Satisfaction" said:

    Trulia does not stand behind it’s own company. Must be a scam, most companies will refund a customers money if they are not satisfied with anything. No questions asked. This is a no brainer, give Noah his money back!

    First rule of sales, “The customer is always right.”, not with Trulia.
    Stay away, far away!

    • March 14, 2014 at 11:27 pm, Phillip said:

      Poorly written article that doesn’t take the time to get the full story.
      Why would someone agree to a contract and then act like they were scammed?
      When I worked at Trulia they did everything they could to make sure the agent/broker was happy with what they purchased. The only reason I left there was because relocated out of state. Here’s my perception about this agent:
      1. He likely used up the entire contract term and then claimed not to be satisfied. No the customer is not always right. Not when a contract is involved. You can’t buy a house, go through all the contracts, live in the house for 6 months then say you don’t like it and just be excused from the contract and get all of your money back!
      2. Most of the agents I spoke with from New York felt too important to answer their phone. It would be my guess that this gentleman thinks he can take his time to respond to leads. Guess what?! People who search online want instant gratification. Consumers need to hear from you right away and know that you want to help them. The New York attitude of acting way too busy all the time doesn’t fly. Instead of accepting the fact that Trulia didn’t work for him because he didn’t work his leads properly – he chooses to want a refund and blow up social media about it. Highly unprofessional.

      • March 16, 2014 at 11:39 am, "Dear Trulia Kiss Ass..." said:

        I will spell it for you: “No Satisfaction = Refund” peroid.

        Do you get it now?

        : )

        • March 16, 2014 at 9:06 pm, pgallup said:

          Your logic is false.
          There are instances where a consumer isn’t satisfied because they didn’t take the time to work the product correctly. I went to the Trulia website to look at the profile for Noah Freedman and it isn’t even complete! It’s free for agents/brokers to complete their profile on Trulia.
          If you were spending money on something – wouldn’t you take the time to make sure it was set up correctly to work for you? I would. I would also accept the blame if I didn’t take the time to set up something correctly if it didn’t work. Do you think advertising is a “get rich quick” product, or something you have to cultivate?

          (your screen name is a reflection of your intelligence level though, so I probably shouldn’t be debating with you)

  4. March 14, 2014 at 11:59 pm, PGallup said:

    Search for another article on this very website about Noah Freedman. Seems like a pattern emerges:
    Bond New York, the Manhattan-based residential brokerage, is facing a lawsuit from Bank of America after allegedly defaulting on $750,000 in loans. The action comes a few days after StreetEasy, the listings provider, sued the firm claiming it failed to pay a hefty advertising bill.
    The firm took out a $500,000 loan in March 2008 and a $250,000 loan in November 2010, both of which were personally guaranteed by Bruno Ricciotti and Noah Freedman, the co-founders of Bond, according to the suit filed Friday in New York State Supreme Court.

  5. March 15, 2014 at 9:22 am, Spellchecker said:

    Wow how embarrassing for the head of a company to be unable to put sentences together as well as poor grammar. Doesn’t he have an assistant to proofread for him?

  6. March 15, 2014 at 6:38 pm, Pgallup said:

    Trulia please work on your customer service. If the owner of a 500 agent firm is not satisfied with your deliverable make it right! We dont need another hit to the stock like last month! Get your shit together and make this right.

    • March 15, 2014 at 8:17 pm, pgallup said:

      I have no idea who the person is above that wrote that – it’s not me. Post under your genuine name instead of trying to take another one.
      If you look at the previous article I attached, it looks as if the owner of a 500 agent firm likes to use up advertising and then not pay for it. In my opinion, Trulia was smart by getting their money upfront and they didn’t have to sue the man like StreetEasy did!

      Read some of the reviews about working for Bond Real Estate on glassdoor.com – a previous employee even says the company is “unethical”

  7. March 17, 2014 at 9:55 am, Alfredo said:

    BOND New York to the top!

  8. March 17, 2014 at 10:39 am, Trulia SOP said:

    As a previous employee of Trulia this does not surprise me at all. I had to leave because of their lack of ethics.

  9. May 30, 2014 at 3:08 pm, Noah Freedman said:

    I am happy to say I was able to reach a satisfactory agreement with Trulia.

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