The Real Deal New York

Posts Tagged ‘NYC Brokerages’

  • From left: Zillow's chief executive Spencer Rascoff and StreetEasy's iPhone app

    Zillow’s Spencer Rascoff and StreetEasy’s iPhone app

    Zillow, the real estate website, plans to make a StreetEasy application available to Android and iPad users in a bid to attract more mobile users to the property-listing site.

    The company, which is based in Seattle, is also planning to relaunch its application for the iPhone. The app for the Apple device currently accounts for about a third of the website’s total traffic, according to Zillow Chief Executive Officer Spencer Rascoff. [more]

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  • the-Queen-of-Prospect-Park-South-92-year-old-Mary-Kay-Gallagher

    Mary Kay Gallagher, the head of small real estate firm in South Prospect Park

    WEEKENDEDITION While New York City’s real estate industry can often seem dominated by big brokerages, many small firms still find a way to get a piece of the action.  [more]

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  • Who really owns NYC’s real estate firms?

    February 11, 2013 10:30AM

    Howard Lorber

    From the February issue:  To outsiders, it may be hard to distinguish between New York City’s big real estate firms. But behind the scenes, even firms of similar sizes and reputations can have vastly different ownership structures. Many of the city’s residential brokerages, for example, have long been privately owned by families. Others have large, publicly traded corporate parents. Still other owners have silent parents, or offer their brokers the opportunity to own a piece of the firm. [more]

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  • From the January issue: With the luxury residential market booming, expensive rentals have recently been in higher demand than ever — getting snapped up faster than usual and, in some cases, sparking bidding wars. Manhattan rents were at an all-time high this past year even as Citi Habitats’ third-quarter rental market report, the most recent data available at press time, showed the historic rental highs that occurred between January and August had plateaued during 2012’s third quarter (see related story: Manhattan sales volume perks up). While in the past rentals were considered a less-prestigious (and lower-paying) sector of the brokerage business, six-figure rental deals have changed that, and a number of high-end brokers have found themselves focused on rentals. [more]

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  • Nest Seekers enigmatic CEO

    October 10, 2012 04:45PM

    Eddie Shapiro

    From the October issue: Eddie Shapiro prefers to remain an enigma. On a recent summer afternoon, the founder of residential brokerage Nest Seekers International is clad in his own version of business casual: a slim-fitting white suit and black loafers, his longish brown hair slicked back, his goatee clipped, his burgundy tie dotted with tiny skulls.

    “To an extent, I like to keep a lot of things in our [firm’s] business a mystery,” Shapiro said. Then he quoted a line from the 1997 film “The Devil’s Advocate”: “No matter how good you are, don’t ever let them see you coming.” [more]

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  • A company Zipcar, a monthly spinning night at a local gym, and expensive bottles of wine: all perks offered by residential brokerages in New York City. But which firm has the best perks? And the best marketing budgets, managers and commission splits?

    This September, The Real Deal will publish our first-ever look at New York City’s best residential brokerages to work for. We’ll be evaluating companies in about a dozen different categories, from splits to training programs to office facilities.

    TRD has already sent out detailed questionnaires to management at a slew of brokerages. The deadline for survey responses is August 1, 2012.

    In early August, we’ll be conducting additional research, including phone surveys of randomly selected brokers at each firm. Decisions will be made by TRD’s editorial staff.

    For more information, please contact Leigh Kamping-Carder at lkc@therealdeal.com or 212-991-5026.

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  • Debra Reece and Judi Desiderio; inset: Sotheby's Sag Harbor office

    For some, summertime in the Hamptons is all about relaxation. Not so for two of the East End’s biggest residential real estate brokerages. Town & Country Real Estate and Sotheby’s International Realty are in the process of expanding their office spaces.

    Town & Country recently moved into a new 1,600-square-foot space in East Hampton that is connected to its current office at 52 Main Street, founder Judi Desiderio told The Real Deal. [more]

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  • Biggest U.S. residential firms

    July 19, 2012 10:30AM

    From the July issue: Every year, The Real Deal publishes its much-anticipated ranking of the largest (and most prolific) residential real estate firms in New York City. But how do those firms, along with New York’s premier suburban brokerages, stack up on the national stage?

    This month, TRD examined a recently released ranking of the country’s 500 largest residential brokerages — published by the research company Real Trends — and came up with a detailed breakdown of how the New York–area firms on the list performed. [more]

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  • Which residential brokerages offer the best perks? Whose managers reign supreme? And where can a broker go to get the best commission splits?

    This September, The Real Deal will attempt to answer these questions, with our first-ever look at New York City’s best residential brokerages to work for. We’ll be evaluating companies in about a dozen different categories, from splits to training programs to office facilities.

    This week, TRD will start sending out detailed questionnaires to a slew of brokerages. We’ll also be conducting additional research, including surveying randomly selected brokers at each firm. Decisions will be made by TRD’s editorial staff.

    The deadline for survey responses is August 1, 2012. For more information, or if you do not receive a questionnaire by Friday, please contact Leigh Kamping-Carder at lkc@therealdeal.com or 212-991-5026.

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  • Ted Gounaris

    From the March issue: Alumni of now-defunct brokerage Homestead NY are starting up a new firm, with a new take on the increasingly popular 100 percent-commission model.

    Called Voro, which stands for Virtual Online Realty Office, the new firm is slated to launch this month. The founders are Ted Gounaris, former managing director at Homestead New York who has also worked at Prudential Douglas Elliman, and Danny Shamooil, founder of Homestead NY and Prime New York. [more]

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  • From the March issue: Nobody really grows up saying, ‘I want to be a real estate agent,’” said Fanny Montalvo, managing director of sales at residential brokerage A.C. Lawrence & Co. and a former information technology recruiter. Still, “a couple years ago everybody was getting their real estate license,” she said. “Today, those people are no longer in the business.” [more]

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  • The rise of Rapid Realty

    February 07, 2012 10:30AM
    From left: Rapid Realty's Anthony Lolli, Adrian Cardona, Gabriela Falquez and Carlos Angelucci

    From left: Rapid Realty's Anthony Lolli, Adrian Cardona, Gabriela Falquez and Carlos Angelucci

    From the February issue: Rapid Realty’s Brooklyn headquarters was buzzing on a Thursday afternoon last month, as agents jostled for space at computers lining the exposed-brick wall. For an office housing 30 agents, the sleekly designed space is tiny — only around 500 square feet.

    But that’s the point, explained Rapid founder Anthony Lolli; the young rental brokerage prides itself on being efficient. The black-and-metal bar stools that serve as the only seating, for example, are “not supposed to be comfortable,” he said, since agents are encouraged to be out doing deals rather than sitting in them. [more]

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  • In 2009, the median price for real estate brokerage services for those that sold a home was more than the
    costs of health care and entertainment combined and more than the cost
    of food, HomingCloud.com reported. Using 2009 data from the Bureau of
    Labor Statistics on consumer expenditures, the blog calculated the
    distribution of expenditures for a year when a person incurs brokerage
    expenses. In the example (see image to the left), if an individual sold a house in 2009
    spending $12,000 in broker commissions, it would come out to 20 percent of all of his or her expenditures. According to the blog, the calculation illustrates how a
    one-time payment of a 6 percent broker commission has implications for long-term personal expenditures. [HomingCloud][more]

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  • n 2009, the median price for real estate brokerage services was more than the
    costs of health care and entertainment combined and more than the cost
    of food, HomingCloud.com reported. Using 2009 data from the Bureau of
    Labor Statistics on consumer expenditures, the blog calculated the
    distribution of expenditures for a year when a person incurs brokerage
    expenses. In the example (see above), if an individual sold a house in 2009
    spending $12,000 in broker commissions, it would come out to 20 percent of all of his or her expenditures. According to the blog, the calculation illustrates how a
    one-time payment of broker commissions  has implications for long-term personal expenditures. [HomingCloud] 

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  • n 2009, the median price for real estate brokerage services was more than the
    costs of health care and entertainment combined and more than the cost
    of food, HomingCloud.com reported. Using 2009 data from the Bureau of
    Labor Statistics on consumer expenditures, the blog calculated the
    distribution of expenditures for a year when a person incurs brokerage
    expenses. In the example (see above), if an individual sold a house in 2009
    spending $12,000 in broker commissions, it would come out to 20 percent of all of his or her expenditures. According to the blog, the calculation illustrates how a
    one-time payment of broker commissions  has implications for long-term personal expenditures. [HomingCloud] 

    Comments
  • n 2009, the median price for real estate brokerage services was more than the
    costs of health care and entertainment combined and more than the cost
    of food, HomingCloud.com reported. Using 2009 data from the Bureau of
    Labor Statistics on consumer expenditures, the blog calculated the
    distribution of expenditures for a year when a person incurs brokerage
    expenses. In the example (see above), if an individual sold a house in 2009
    spending $12,000 in broker commissions, it would come out to 20 percent of all of his or her expenditures. According to the blog, the calculation illustrates how a
    one-time payment of broker commissions  has implications for long-term personal expenditures. [HomingCloud] 

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  • Brokerage Bond New York scheduled to offer a deal on online coupon site Groupon today that would charge consumers $25 for $1,000 off closing costs in the sale or purchase of their next home. However, Noah Freedman, co-founder of Bond, was notified over the weekend that the deal would have to be pulled due to legal reasons, according to Crain’s, though the exact reasons weren’t immediately available.

    This comes a month after Chicago real estate brokerage Dream Town Realty became the first real estate firm to use Groupon to attract new clients…. [more]

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  • The biggest Queens brokerages

    December 17, 2010 10:23AM

    Click for the full list

    From the December issue: While the first-time homebuyer tax credit propelled sales in Queens through September, business has since cooled.

    Record-low interest rates are helping to stir sales, but the borough’s brokerage firms are in a still-depressed market — and have been fighting for every closing by hiring top talent from competing firms, beefing up training, and investing in new technology.

    This month, The Real Deal looked at the biggest residential firms in the borough by number of agents. In the battle, Bayside-based Keller Williams Realty has emerged as the king of Queens. [more]

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  • A new Palm Beach-based brokerage is planning to open a Manhattan office this summer. The Next Step Realty aims to help recent college graduates transition from home to apartment, by pairing 20-something clients with like-minded, similarly aged agents. The company currently has 35 brokers in 17 different U.S. cities including Boca Raton, Miami and New York City…. [more]

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  • Anthony Longo (insert) the CEO of CondoDomain, and a screengrab from the site (Click image for larger version)

    New York City is getting a new VOW-based brokerage company, in what may soon become a flood of companies taking advantage of the new technology.
    Boston-based CondoDomain, a Web-based discount real estate brokerage, is now a member of the Real Estate Board of New York and offers a VOW, or virtual office Web site. That means that customers who log onto CondoDomain’s New York site can browse through all of the listings in REBNY’s database.

    CondoDomain founder and CEO Anthony Longo told The Real Deal that the appearance of VOWs in New York City has opened the floodgates for new companies like his to penetrate the lucrative New York City market.

    “The VOW will lay the groundwork for companies like ours to come in and compete,” said Longo, who has had his eye on the New York market for years. … [more]

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