The Real Deal New York

Posts Tagged ‘queensway’

  • 693-fifth

    Rendering of 693 Fifth Avenue (Credit: Neocape)

    Thor Equities’ renovation of the former Takashimaya department store in Midtown and the 3.5-mile QueensWay Cultural Greenway are among the latest projects to receive a new batch of eye-popping renderings in the past week or so. Click here for a slideshow.

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  • QueensWay rendering

    QueensWay rendering

    The proposed QueensWay Park Project, which would turn a 3.5-mile chunk of abandoned rail in Queens into an elevated pathway and park, has the support of 75 percent of the borough’s residents, a new survey shows. [more]

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  • QueensWay rendering, Facebook and Twitter logos

    QueensWay rendering, Facebook and Twitter logos

    The new QueensWay, a High Line-esque 3.5-mile linear park along an old stretch of Long Island Railroad track, is turning to social media to get feedback on project design from the digital communities. [more]

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  • queensway_trail

    QueensWay rendering

    Organizers of the QueensWay park project — also sometimes called “the Queens High Line” — have reeled in $1 million in funding and a feasibility study is finally slated to launch next week, the Wall Street Journal reported.

    The nonprofit the Trust for Public Land is announcing today that two New York-based firms, WXY Architecture + Urban Design and dlandstudio, will head up the study to determine the project’s cost and scope, and create a conceptual design. [more]

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  • Governor Cuomo and the abandoned rail line in Queens

    A plan to build an above ground park on a 3.5 mile stretch of abandoned rail line in Queens just received a big endorsement in the form of a $467,000 grant from Governor Andrew Cuomo, the Trust for Public Land announced today, according to DNAinfo. The money is earmarked for a  feasibility study and analysis of what has been dubbed the QueensWay project, a controversial High Line-style park in Queens. “Now other people recognized that potentially this could be a great project for Queens,” Andrea Crawford, a member of Friends of the QueensWay, said. “Now it has real teeth and we are really excited.”… [more]

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  • The abandoned rail line in Queens

    The affects of Hurricane Sandy on Queens has galvanized the debate surrounding a 3.5-mile stretch of above-ground rail line connecting central Queens to the Rockaway peninsula, Crain’s reported. A community organization, known as the Friends of Queensway, for months has been fighting for a High Line-style park, which could revitalize the area with new restaurants and shops. But following the storm, the need for better infrastructure, particularly better transportation, has become apparent, and more voices are being raised in favor of restoring the old railroad line. [more]

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  • Abandoned Rockaway Beach LIRR tracks

    A proposal for creating a High Line-style park in Queens, dubbed the QueensWay, has met some opposition from local community groups, DNAinfo reported. The QueensWay proposal would turn 3.5 miles of abandoned rails into a public park.One of the groups that has been slow to embrace the plan is the Forest Hills Civic Association.

    The QueensWay project is just one of two proposals for the rails. The other aims to rebuild the tracks, that run through such neighborhoods as Ozone Park, Richmond Hill and Rego Park, into a commuter railway to the Rockaways. [more]

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  • Rockaway Beach LIRR tracks

    Is Queens’ future better served by more green space or improved public transit? Queens activists will meet this weekend to hash out the details of the much-discussed potential for a High Line-like park and the New York Daily News provided insight into the framework of the debate.

    A group called Friends of QueensWay wants to transform the abandoned Rockaway Beach branch Long Island Rail Road tracks into an outdoor park. It has raised thousands for a study of their proposal, which proponents believe would make areas of Woodhaven and Richmond Hill safer and increase foot traffic to those under-the-radar neighborhoods. [more]

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