How Gracie Mansion became NYC’s White House

New York /
Jan.January 04, 2014 02:00 PM

 Although New Yorkers think of historic Gracie Mansion as the official residence of the mayor, it’s role as New York City’s White House is relatively recent.

In fact, the first NYC mayor to occupy the home was Fiorello La Guardi, who only took up residence in the home in 1942 after Robert Moses pushed the idea that the mayor of New York City should have an official home. Since then only nine other mayors have lived at the property, making Bill de Blasio the tenth, according to Curbed.

One reason so few New York City mayors have chosen to live in the tax-payer funded home is that it is relatively small – less than 4,000 square feet — and fairly restrictive. The home can only be used for official city business, which means only visiting public officials and the mayor’s family are allowed to stay in the home for even one night. This of course meant that Rudy Giuliani was unable to have his then-girlfriend live at the home with him. [Curbed]Christopher Cameron


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