The Real Deal New York

Manhattan retailers jam Bedford Ave. as Brooklynites flee

February 05, 2014 03:30PM

As retail rents continue their skyward trajectory along Williamsburg’s Bedford Avenue, local shops are departing for other Brooklyn locales and Manhattanites are moving in.

L&L Nail & Spa has shuttered at 193 Bedford Ave., and Newmark Grubb Knight Frank broker Gal Horovitz is now marketing the spot with an eye toward Manhattan-based businesses. Having already brokered a deal with Juice Generation, which currently boasts 10 Manhattan locations, he pointed to the area’s uptick in vacancies and increasing number of Manhattan newcomers as the natural state of a hot neighborhood.

“I don’t think there is any question that where the market is when they signed the lease and where it is today is different,” Horovitz told Bedford + Bowery of the departed tenants. “It comes time to sign a new lease and they may look at the price and say this doesn’t make sense anymore.”

Among the artery’s recently-departed are Vietnamese restaurant An Nhau at 172 Bedford, Polish eatery S&B Restaurant at 194 Bowery and New York Muffins at 287 Bedford. Men’s boutique By Robert James relocated from its Bedford pop-up shop to a new location on Grand Street, and clothier Vice Versa — formerly located in the same building — shuttered and relocated to Bushwick for a “better deal on rent,” shop owners told Bedford + Bowery.

Among the replacements are Idlewild Books, a Flatiron-based shop with a new outpost inside the 218 Bedford Ave. mini mall, and Wild, a new 340 Bedford Ave. pizzeria with another location in the West Village. [Bedford + Bowery]Julie Strickland

  • Crian Bashman

    Sad how short-sighted many of these retail brokers and their land owner clients are. If the people that moved to Williamsburg wanted Manhattan retail, they would have stayed in Manhattan.

    • momentum

      Manhattan gifted Williamsburg and created something out of nothing – now it is time for the same to happen to even further out parts of Brooklyn. Believe that the developers are growing this city and preventing it from sliding backwards.

      I remember the decades when that part of Brooklyn was totally dead – now something is there that has tourists walking across the bridge for it. They did it without any government subsidies. They did it with brains, patience and endurance … and media support.