NYC’s oldest bridge reopening after decades

The High Bridge connects Washington Heights in Manhattan to Highbridge in the Bronx

TRD New York /
Jun.June 06, 2015 10:00 AM

Before the High Line became the “it” pedestrian promenade, there was the High Bridge – the city’s oldest bridge. Now, after more than 40 years of being closed to the public, the bridge, which connects Washington Heights in Manhattan to Highbridge in the Bronx, will finally reopen next week.

Originally opening in 1848, the High Bridge was an aqueduct that brought water to what is now the Bronx – back then, Westchester County. It was closed decades ago to the general public, although it was still open for tours by NYC Park Rangers until the late 1990s, when it was closed completely due to safety concerns, according to Welcome2theBronx.com.

Now, the 2,000-foot bridge, which rises 140 feet, will finally reopen on June 9.

The city broke ground on the $61 million restoration of the bridge in January 2013, and work was supposed to be completed by December. Like seven other regional parks, the bridge was restored   under PlaNYC, a collaboration between the Departments of Parks, Environmental Protection, Design and Construction and the Landmarks Preservation Commission. [Welcome2theBronx.com]Christopher Cameron


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