The rich lord over a walled Manhattan in new graphic novel

"Bleed 2039" pits the proletariat against the megarich

New York /
Jul.July 24, 2015 04:10 PM

A new graphic novel set in 2039 presents a dark, dystopian vision of a future New York… or, depending on one’s view, an agreeable one.

“Bleed 2039,” the first book in a series by writer Alan James Edwards and illustrator Abdul Rashid, depicts New York as a gated community controlled by the rich in the aftermath of an economic disaster.

In the author’s vision, New York’s elite build walls around Manhattan, prohibit the sale of cigarettes and force the lowly proletarians to use a pass called a “Exeat” to enter and exit. But all is not lost for the masses, as they discover a more fulfilling life in the absence of modern amenities and technology. Where? Upstate, of course.

The neo-noir sci-fi novel, which opens the four-book Bleed series, debuted at New York Comic Con in October. A Kickstarter campaign to publish the series has received $890 from 20 donors. The project goal is to raise $10,000 by Aug. 11. — Ariel Stulberg


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