De Blasio moves to ease NYCHA eviction rules

The move is intended to keep repeat criminal offenders out

TRD New York /
Nov.November 08, 2015 11:22 AM

NYC criminals who repeatedly offend on New York City Housing Authority properties may soon lose their homes. Mayor de Blasio is looking to overhaul the eviction process for those living in NYCHA housing so that it is easier to give criminals the boot.

“Mayor de Blasio is requiring NYCHA and NYPD to take new steps to ensure criminals are not allowed to trespass or live in public housing,” Mayor de Blasio’s spokesperson Karen Hinton told the New York Daily News.

The changes may be motivated in part by the case of NYCHA tenant Tyrone Howard who is accused of murdering Officer Randolph Holder last month. Howard was allowed to live in public housing despite having an extensive criminal record.

“The number of individuals with criminal records who have been excluded from public housing has increased in the past year, but the mayor recognizes more needs to be done,” Hinton said. “While no one wants to evict tenants in good standing, the mayor has made clear he will not tolerate tenants harboring criminals who make living conditions unsafe for others.” [NYDN]Christopher Cameron


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