Gov. scientists team with NYC architects to create 3-D printed, off-the-grid home

The future is now

New York /
Mar.March 06, 2016 12:00 PM

Earlier this year, the architects behind 1 World Trade Center met with researchers from a lab in Tennessee at the International Builders Conference. The researchers presented an unusual 3-D printed building that looks something like a cross between an airstream and a fish. But it could be the future.

The structure is called the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy Structure, or more simply, AMIE 1.0. It’s one of the largest carbon fiber structures ever created with a 3-D printer and shares energy with an 3-D printed SUV. In the future, this could make living off the grid far easier.

U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee’s College of Architecture and Design, and architecture firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill have collaborated on the project with the goal of exploring “larger urban applications around energy,” Phil Enquist, a partner at SOM, told Wired.

“We were really intrigued with it because the whole idea of 3-D printing is that eventually you can design a building, and print it in a way that you have no waste,” Enquist added. “You can have 20 or 30 percent of material waste that all goes into a landfill,” at a typical construction project.

And it’s also energy efficient. Oak Ridge scientists Johney Green and Roderick Jackson hoped to connect two of the biggest energy suck in our daily lives — houses and cars. So they designed the building and the car so that they can pass electricity back and forth.

“If the building needs to, it uses energy from the sun to meet its needs. If it doesn’t, or if we’re about to see clouds in the next four hours, it can store it—in the battery, or in the vehicle,” Jackson said. [Wired]Christopher Cameron


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
These are the tallest towers underway in NYC
These are the tallest towers underway
in NYC
These are the tallest towers underway
in NYC
A new competition asks what would houses on Mars look like (Credit: Getty Images, Pixabay)
Architecture’s final frontier: Here’s what houses on Mars might look like
Architecture’s final frontier: Here’s what houses on Mars might look like
Deans of design: Ranking New York’s busiest architecture firms
Deans of design: Ranking New York’s busiest architecture firms
Deans of design: Ranking New York’s busiest architecture firms
The Nakagin Capsule Tower in Tokyo. (Getty)
Landmark Tokyo tower made up of cubes coming down
Landmark Tokyo tower made up of cubes coming down
A Smurf house? (Caldwell Banker)
Smurf-erriffic! Michigan home seems to be inspired by cartoon
Smurf-erriffic! Michigan home seems to be inspired by cartoon
From left: Ismene Speliotis, executive director, MHANY; Clare Miflin, director, Center for Zero Waste Design; a rendering of The Peninsula in the Bronx (Mutual Housing Association of NY, LinkedIn/Ismene Speliotis, Center for Zero Waste Design)
Bronx development aims to turn trash into cash
Bronx development aims to turn trash into cash
Floorplay founder Batya Cohen. (Floorplay)
How a student of architecture used the pandemic to launch a woman-owned business
How a student of architecture used the pandemic to launch a woman-owned business
James Davidson, partner, SLCE Architects; Gary Handel, managing partner, Handel Architects LLP; Mary-Jean Eastman, co-founder, Perkins-Eastman (Google Maps, SLCE Architects, Handel Architects LLP, Perkins-Eastman)
These were the city’s 10 most active architects in 2021
These were the city’s 10 most active architects in 2021
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...