What’s a degree worth? A third of homeowners say they’d borrow against their homes to pay for it

The finding comes from Bankrate.com's survey of American homeowners

New York Weekend Edition /
Sep.September 22, 2018 01:36 PM

(Credit: Pexels, Max Pixels)

Homeowners across the country have about $5.8 trillion in equity and — notwithstanding some hesitancy — there’s some surprising ways they plan on using it. Chief among them is to get a degree.

In a recent survey, one of the most common reasons to borrow against a home was to pay off student debt or other education-related costs, CNBC reported, citing data from Bankrate.com. Nearly a third of homeowners who responded said they believed that loans to pay for education were a “good” use of their home equity.

About one in six homeowners reported that they felt borrowing against their home to pay bills was a “good” option.

The number of new home-equity lines of credits jumped in the first quarter of 2018 — despite expectations that the new tax bill would deter borrowers, and cash-out refinancing is at its highest point in about a decade, as The Real Deal reported. [CNBC] —Erin Hudson


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