Evictions down in wake of New York rent law

New rules expand the lookback period to six years

TRD New York /
Nov.November 26, 2019 03:10 PM
Evictions filed against tenants for nonpayment fell by more than 46 percent (Credit: iStock)

Evictions filed against tenants for nonpayment fell by more than 46 percent (Credit: iStock)

Since the state legislature took a hacksaw to New York’s rent law in June, New York City has seen a precipitous decline in eviction proceedings.

Evictions filed against tenants for nonpayment fell by more than 35,000, or 46 percent, following the law’s enactment in June, compared with the same period in 2018, the Wall Street Journal reported. Eviction cases not involving nonpayment of rent also declined, but only by 12 percent.

New York City’s supervising judge for housing courts, Judge Jean T. Schneider, attributed the sharp decline in nonpayment cases to new rules that give tenants more time to respond to notices of lateness before a lawsuit is filed.

Under the previous framework, landlords only had to wait three days to file an eviction suit after giving the tenant notice. Now they must wait 14 days.

Eviction filings decreased by 61 percent in July and 68 percent in August compared with the same periods in 2018. They have picked up a bit since then, but have still fallen 35 percent overall from last year.

Tenant lawyers point to the new rent law and an expansion of access to counsel for some NYC tenants, but real estate attorneys attribute the drop in evictions to new rules that, allow rent-regulated tenants to dispute past rent charges going back six years instead of four. The expanded lookback period deters landlords from filing eviction proceedings because they fear tenants will file counterclaims, the attorneys said. [WSJ] — Georgia Kromrei


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
250 Fort Washington Ave and 310 Convent Avenue with Housing Rights Initiative’s Aaron Carr (Credit: iStock, Facebook, Google Maps)

Two more rent-overcharge lawsuits get class-action status

Clipper Equity's David Bistricer (inset) and the US Supreme Court (Credit: RealInsight and Getty Images)

US Supreme Court denies Clipper’s rent regulation petition

Judge Janet DiFiore and attorney Deborah Riegel (Credit: North Country Public Radio and Rosenberg & Estis)

High court hearing rent overcharge cases puts lawyers on the spot

The drop in evictions may be a result of confusion over the implementation of the law. CHIP's Jay Martin (inset) (Credit: iStock and Twitter)

Evictions fell 18 percent in NYC after rent law passed

New York Capital Region Apartment Association spokesperson Jaime Cain (Credit: iStock, Boylan Code)

Landlords of the world, unite?

Control freaks: Institutional players take over landlords’ war on rent caps

Control freaks: Institutional players take over landlords’ war on rent caps

From left: Assembly member Joseph Lentol, Governor Andrew Cuomo and State Senator Liz Krueger (Credit: Getty Images)

Tenant harassment bill hits governor’s desk

Stephen Levin, REBNY's Jim Whelan and Brad Lander (Credit: Getty Images)

The bill that won’t die: Will commercial rent control finally pass?

arrow_forward_ios
Loading...