Cuomo extends ban on non-essential work to May 15

Governor’s definition of “essential businesses” has changed dramatically since his order began March 22

TRD New York /
Apr.April 16, 2020 01:37 PM
Governor Andrew Cuomo (Credit: Getty Images)

Governor Andrew Cuomo (Credit: Getty Images)

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Thursday extended his statewide ban on going to non-essential workplaces through May 15.

It is the second extension of the governor’s order, which mandates non-essential businesses halt in-office operations.

“New York Pause has worked,” the governor said, but added, “We’re not there yet.” The decision to gradually reopen businesses will be based on what the infection rates are come May 15.

“What happens after then? I don’t know,” he said. “We will see, depending on what the data shows.”

Cuomo, along with the governors of New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Delaware, announced Monday that the states will create a 24-person group to map out a re-opening plan.

The state had more than 213,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19 as of April 15, according to the governor’s office. More than 12,000 New Yorkers have died from the disease.

Since the ban first took effect on March 22, the definition of what is considered essential has changed dramatically. Construction was initially exempt from the order, but the state subsequently stipulated that only work on affordable housing, healthcare facilities, utilities and transit projects — as well as emergency work — may continue.

In early April, the state deemed real estate brokers essential, then clarified that property showings must be conducted virtually.

For New York City, the economic impact of the pandemic has been dire. The city is expected to lose up to 475,000 jobs by next March and $14 billion in tax revenue over the next three years, according to a new report from the city’s Independent Budget Office. It’s expected that roughly 100,000 of those jobs will be in retail and 86,000 in hotels and restaurants.

Restaurants and hotels have already laid off thousands of workers. Real estate companies, too, have furloughed and laid off employees.


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Governor Andrew Cuomo and Senator James Skoufis (Credit: Getty Images, NY Senate)

Owners of some residential properties can’t hide behind
LLCs anymore

Owners of some residential properties can’t hide behind
LLCs anymore
Governor Andrew Cuomo and 538 Johnson Avenue in Brooklyn (Credit: Google Maps and Getty Images)

Landlords take another hit: Cuomo signs expanded Loft Law

Landlords take another hit: Cuomo signs expanded Loft Law
Governor Andrew Cuomo (Credit: Getty Images)

Cuomo wants to exempt NYC from prevailing wage bill

Cuomo wants to exempt NYC from prevailing wage bill
(iStock)

Real estate stocks end week mixed as virus fears rise and markets fall

Real estate stocks end week mixed as virus fears rise and markets fall
A photo illustration of SL Green's Marc Holliday (Getty; iStock; SL Green)

NYC offices get creative to lure workers back

NYC offices get creative to lure workers back
Knotel CEO Amol Sarva (iStock)

Knotel slashes its workforce again

Knotel slashes its workforce again
New foreclosure filings are rising again as limits are lifted (iStock)

Foreclosure filings ramp up, especially in minority neighborhoods

Foreclosure filings ramp up, especially in minority neighborhoods
The MTA board approved rent relief for small businesses in Grand Central and other locations (iStock)

MTA cuts rent up to 90% for small businesses

MTA cuts rent up to 90% for small businesses
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...