Tishman Speyer cuts short Rock Center rink season — and not due to Covid

Art Deco complex’s sunken plaza will finally be renovated

New York /
Nov.November 09, 2020 11:00 AM
The skating rink at Rockefeller Center (Getty)

The skating rink at Rockefeller Center (Getty)

This year’s ice skating season at Rockefeller Center will be cut short, and it’s not because of the pandemic.

Developer Tishman Speyer, the owner of the historic Art Deco complex, is moving ahead with its long-planned renovation of the complex’s sunken plaza, which holds the rink during the holiday season, and the underground shopping concourse, the New York Times reported.

The famous ice skating rink will open on Nov. 21 and end its season on Jan. 17, with the number of skaters limited to maintain proper social distancing. Tickets will go on sale Nov. 12, according to the Times.

After the rink closes in January, the renovation project will begin. The goal is to “democratize” the area, Rob Speyer, president and CEO of the company, told the Times.

“We want to make it completely accessible to people,” Speyer said.

Until recently, concourse restaurants occupied the north and south sides of the link, giving front-row seats to those who can pay for the privilege. But those restarutans are now gone, and with the renovation, all the concourse around the sunken plaza will become accessible by the public, according to the Times.

The existing windows surrounding the plaza will be replaced to bring more natural light into the concourse, according to the project architect, Gabellini Sheppard Associates.

The staircase to the plaza will be modified to encourage people to flow down to the sunken plaza, and the granite John D. Rockefeller Credo plaque will be relocated. Those changes have been decried by preservationists who believe they’re an unnecessary commercial gesture, according to the Times.

The normally bustling complex — popular with tourists, and a hub of office activity — has been impacted by the pandemic, with office occupancy only at 13 percent, according to a Tishman spokesperson.

[NYT] — Akiko Matsuda


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
The New York Life Sciences and Biotechnology Center at First Avenue and 41st Street (NY Life Sciences)
Life sciences leasing breaks annual record in five months
Life sciences leasing breaks annual record in five months
The commercial market was hit hard by the pandemic, and property tax revenue is expected to fall 5 percent. (iStock)
Tax bills show how much Covid devalued NYC real estate
Tax bills show how much Covid devalued NYC real estate
Richard Segal of Seavest Investment Group, David Marx of Marx Development Group and 902 Quentin Road in Brooklyn (Photos via Seavest Investment Group, Marx Development Group and VRMNY)
Westchester firm buys $54M Brooklyn medical building
Westchester firm buys $54M Brooklyn medical building
546 Broadway and Isaac Chetrit (Google Maps)
Uniqlo finalizes $160M buy of its flagship at 546 Broadway
Uniqlo finalizes $160M buy of its flagship at 546 Broadway
Real Estate EFTs See Investment Amid Pandemic Recovery
Why investors are rushing into real estate ETFs
Why investors are rushing into real estate ETFs
Manhattan sublease surge shows signs of slowing
Manhattan sublease scourge finally abates
Manhattan sublease scourge finally abates
Blooma founder Shayne Skaff (LinkedIn, iStock)
CRE fintech startup Blooma nabs $15M in funding
CRE fintech startup Blooma nabs $15M in funding
Distressed real estate investors are digging through commercial mortgage-backed securities to seize, fix and flip troubled properties. (iStock)
Distressed investors tap throwback strategy, target CMBS
Distressed investors tap throwback strategy, target CMBS
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...