For some employees, WFH now includes a view of the Mediterranean

As Covid cases spike, some Europeans and Americans — not just the ultra wealthy — have been heading to warmer climes

National Weekend Edition /
Nov.November 21, 2020 02:00 PM
Palermo, Italy (iStock)

Palermo, Italy (iStock)

As winter nears and coronavirus infections spike in the U.S. and parts of Europe, some workers are heading for warmer, more remote climes.

Those fortunate Europeans and Americans — but not ultra wealthy — are leaving cities like Paris, London and New York for locales around the Mediterranean, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Besides the weather, some destinations have the added benefit of a lower cost of living. Jennifer Babin, whose employer is based in Paris, is working in Sicily. She pays about $710 per month for a two-bedroom apartment in downtown Palermo, a third of the rent she paid in Paris.

Manchester, England, native Duncan Wallis also moved to Sicily, and said he sees “no good reason to leave,” given that restrictions in Italy will be similar to those in his home country.

“I wanted to go to a place where I could get a bit of sunshine, spend more time outside, and where rents would be a little cheaper,” he told the Journal. “It’s working pretty well.”

Americans are restricted in their travel, but can get to some European countries if they are seeking residency. Jincey Lumpkin and her wife flew to Portugal from New York in September. They went house hunting with plans to stay permanently when their residency visa is approved.

Lumpkin works in the beauty industry as a writer and is still working on an East Coast schedule, which she says works with her night-owl schedule. She called it a “blessing in disguise” when she was laid off from an advertising firm this summer.
Some hotels are also offering long-stay packages catered specifically to people working abroad. [WSJ] — Dennis Lynch 


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