NYC to revive $17B in public construction projects

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced city will begin renovating schools, housing and parks

New York /
Mar.March 02, 2021 10:15 AM
Mayor Bill de Blasio (Getty, iStock)

Mayor Bill de Blasio (Getty, iStock)

The city is planning to revive about $17 billion in municipal construction projects after the city stopped contracting projects at the start of the pandemic.

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Monday that work can begin on public projects, according to Commercial Observer. City-contracted projects — for things like schools, housing projects and parks — have been largely stalled due to coronavirus restrictions.

The construction revamp will be led by Lorraine Grillo, the city’s recently appointed “recovery czar,” who said that more than 1,700 projects will be underway by the end of March. Those will include sewer upgrades and street improvements as part of the Vision Zero campaign, according to the publication.

Grillo said that with construction projects coming back many small contractors will have the opportunity to rehire staff.

Gary LaBarbera, president of the Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York, told Crainb’s that restarting construction will bring back tens of thousands of people to their worksites.

“1,700 construction sites resuming work means that tens of thousands of tradesmen and tradeswomen will return to their worksites, earn a middle-class wage, and restore a sense of vibrancy to the five boroughs,” LaBarbera said.

[CO, Crain’s] — Keith Larsen


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