Google’s hybrid model will allow 20% of employees to work remotely

Parent company Alphabet announced a series of changes to its work format

National /
May.May 06, 2021 12:15 PM
Google CEO Sundar Pichai (Getty, iStock)

Google CEO Sundar Pichai (Getty, iStock)

Google’s future in a post-pandemic world is looking pretty flexible.

Parent company Alphabet announced a series of changes to the company’s work format that will result in 40 percent of its staffers working from new locations, the Wall Street Journal reported.

In a company email, Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai said about 20 percent of staff will work from home permanently, 20 percent will work out of offices at a new location and 60 percent will work from their current location. Employees can apply for both location change options and will need approval from their managers.

The company is also moving to a hybrid workweek, where employees can spend three days per week at the office and two days working from wherever is best for them, the publication reported.

Another perk: With manager’s approval, staff can work from anywhere they want for four weeks of the year.

Pichai said the changes were an effort to help employees do their best work.

Google is a major occupier and owner of office space. In addition to its sprawling campus in Mountain View, California, the tech giant owns its offices at Chelsea Market and 111 Eighth Avenue and leases other locations in Manhattan.

Other tech companies have adopted flexible work policies for life after the pandemic, such as Salesforce and Microsoft. It’s a contrast from major banks like Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan, which expect most employees to return to the office.

A recent survey by JLL found that roughly 72 percent of employees do not want to return to the office full time, with the majority preferring a hybrid work-from-home model.

[WSJ] — Cordilia James





    Related Articles

    arrow_forward_ios
    Eric Gordon
    Eric Gordon on the evolution of the residential data game — and how to stay competitive in the new world
    Eric Gordon on the evolution of the residential data game — and how to stay competitive in the new world
    Big Tech locations in NYC
    MAP: Here’s a look at all the Big Tech locations in NYC
    MAP: Here’s a look at all the Big Tech locations in NYC
    What will proptech look like in 2019 and beyond?
    What will proptech look like in 2019 and beyond?
    What will proptech look like in 2019 and beyond?
    Taconic Partners' Matthew Weir and Hudson Research Center 61 at 9 West 54th Street (iStock, Taconic Partners, Hudson Research Center)
    RPI signs at Taconic and Silverstein’s life sciences hub
    RPI signs at Taconic and Silverstein’s life sciences hub
    Harry and Linda Macklowe (Getty Images, Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY, Sotheby's, iStock)
    Macklowe art collection fetches nearly $1B at auction
    Macklowe art collection fetches nearly $1B at auction
    Buildots' Aviv Leibovici, Roy Danon and Yakir Sudry (Buildots)
    Construction-tech firm Buildots raises $60M in Series C round
    Construction-tech firm Buildots raises $60M in Series C round
    660 Fifth Avenue in Manhattan and Macquarie Group's Shemara Wikramanayake (Brookfield Properties, iStock, Macquarie Group, Illustration by Kevin Cifuentes for The Real Deal)
    Brookfield signs first tenant at 660 Fifth Avenue
    Brookfield signs first tenant at 660 Fifth Avenue
    Major Food Group managing partner Jeff Zalaznick in front of 37 Hudson Yards (Major Food Group, Google Maps)
    Major Food Group bringing members club to Hudson Yards
    Major Food Group bringing members club to Hudson Yards
    arrow_forward_ios

    The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

    Loading...