Broker who stormed Capitol apologizes as she is charged

Jenna Ryan said she was fooled and regrets “everything”

National /
Feb.February 11, 2021 10:15 AM
Jenna Ryan (Twitter.com/DotJenna)

Jenna Ryan (Twitter.com/DotJenna)

Jenna Ryan, a Texas real estate broker who infamously took a private jet to participate in the Capitol insurrection, has been charged for her role in the riot.

Ryan, 50, was arrested Jan. 15 and charged with two federal misdemeanor counts of knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted government building without lawful authority and disorderly conduct, Business Insider reported.

Now, however, she says she regrets “everything.”

“I bought into a lie, and the lie is the lie, and it’s embarrassing,” she told the Washington Post.

Video footage from the event shows Ryan posing next to shattered windows, wearing a Trump beanie. At one point while livestreaming from the Capitol steps, she turns her phone’s camera to face herself, and says, “Y’all know who to hire for your Realtor. Jenna Ryan for your Realtor.”

After the attack, she also bragged on Twitter: “We just stormed the Capital. It was one of the best days of my life.”

Prosecutors claim she yelled “Fight for freedom! Fight for freedom” as she rushed into the building.

Ryan now says she didn’t come to D.C. to raid the Capitol, but got caught up in the event after she saw President Donald Trump on TV at their hotel telling his supporters to “fight like hell.”

The Post found that Ryan, like many participants in the riot, had a history of financial problems.
She is paying off a $37,000 lien for unpaid federal taxes, nearly lost her home to foreclosure, filed for bankruptcy in 2012 and was slapped with another IRS tax lien in 2010.

Two other people who flew on the private jet with Ryan were also charged Feb. 5.

[Business Insider] — Sasha Jones






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