Amazon unveils woodsy plans for HQ2

Virginia campus’s second phase includes three office buildings, retail, amphitheater

National /
Feb.February 02, 2021 11:45 AM
Renderings of Amazon HQ2 and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos (Photos via NBBJ/Getty)

Renderings of Amazon HQ2 and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos (Photos via NBBJ/Getty)

Amazon has unveiled new plans for its second headquarters in Northern Virginia that will have an outdoorsy, woodsy theme.

The tech giant’s second phase of its campus in Arlington, Virginia, will include three 22-story office buildings, a smaller retail building, an outdoor amphitheater, a dog run and parking for about 950 bicycles, according to the Wall Street Journal. It will be encircled by woodlands.

The highlight of the project will be a 350-foot tower named the Helix that features two spiraling outdoor walkways along with trees and plants from Virginia, according to the newspaper. The first buildings of the second phase are expected to be finished in 2025.

Inside the buildings, there could be more plants, meeting space, offices and studios for artist residency.

The plans are part of the more than $2.5 billion, 25,000-employee office campus known as HQ2.

Plans for the second phase have to go through a public review process. Amazon looks to break ground on the project in early 2022. A pair of office buildings that will accommodate 12,500 Amazon employees are already being built nearby.

Amazon tapped Washington, D.C.-based architecture firm NBBJ to design the development.

Amazon initially planned to build two HQ2 campuses, and chose Long Island City, Queens, in 2018 for the second one, after an intense competition by cities and regions across the nation. But in February 2019, the Seattle-based company scrapped its plans for the New York headquarters after pushback from New York City politicians and activists.

Virginia, by contrast, greeted the internet retailer with open arms.

Amazon’s design for its Virginia campus could be a harbinger of future office designs as more companies look to bring employees back to the office after switching to remote work during the pandemic.

[WSJ] — Keith Larsen


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Southold Residents Push to Limit Building of Huge Homes
Huge home headache hassles North Fork locals
Huge home headache hassles North Fork locals
A view of the West Main Street development site (Google Maps)
Stamford developer to downsize plan after pushback
Stamford developer to downsize plan after pushback
Hartz Mountain Industries CEO Leonard Stern and 235 Pinelawn Road (Google Maps, Hartz Mountain)
Warehouse developer accused of violating “Long Island First” policy
Warehouse developer accused of violating “Long Island First” policy
Self-certification would bypass a sometimes lengthy municipal approvals process. (iStock)
State may let professionals self-certify Long Island projects
State may let professionals self-certify Long Island projects
Hinchcliffe Stadium and a rendering of the restoration project (Getty, BAW Development)
BAW scores $94M to redevelop Paterson stadium
BAW scores $94M to redevelop Paterson stadium
Amazon signs lease with Lincoln Equities for 360K-sf warehouse in Rutherford
Amazon signs lease with Lincoln Equities for 360K-sf warehouse in Rutherford
Amazon signs lease with Lincoln Equities for 360K-sf warehouse in Rutherford
(Google Maps, iStock)
Developer proposes luxury apartments near West Hempstead LIRR station
Developer proposes luxury apartments near West Hempstead LIRR station
A rendering of 12 Eileen’s Path, East Hampton (Corcoran)
Think buying in the Hamptons is tough? Try building
Think buying in the Hamptons is tough? Try building
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...