The Real Deal New York

City beat its affordable housing goals in 2014

There were 17,300 units built or preserved last year

January 16, 2015 08:30AM

Mayor Bill de Blasio (center), along with Public Advocate Letitia James, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and other officials in Fort Greene during the initial announcement of the housing plan (Credit: Hiten Samtani)

Mayor Bill de Blasio (center), along with Public Advocate Letitia James, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and other officials in Fort Greene during the initial announcement of the housing plan (Credit: Hiten Samtani)

Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration built or preserved 17,300 units of affordable housing in 2014. That figure represents about 8.6 percent of his overall 200,000-unit goal, and exceeds the city’s projection of 16,000 units for 2014.

Last year, the city preserved 11,185 affordable apartments and financed the creation of 6,191 new units, according to Crain’s. The mayor announced the numbers during a press conference in Brooklyn on Thursday.

Of the 17,300 units that were created and preserved in 2014, about four percent were affordable to “extremely low-income families,” who earn less than $25,150 per year for a family of four. Most of the apartments went to those families who make between $41,951 and $67,120 per year.

About 1,300 more units than predicted were added in 2014. The city is looking to preserve and create roughly 20,000 units per year.

“It is a muscular plan,” the mayor said, according to Crain’s. “It is a plan that sees a problem and gets in the middle of it, rather than just watching as affordable building after affordable building slowly fades away.” [Crain’s] Claire Moses

  • no-permits

    words like preserved and projected are not concrete. i think they fell short.

  • george

    What a tool face!

  • Charles Dale

    “Of the 17,300 units that were created and preserved in 2014, about four percent were affordable to “extremely low-income families,” who earn less than $25,150 per year for a family of four. Most of the apartments went to those families who make between $41,951 and $67,120 per year.”

    That’s a start. The median income for New York City is $51,100 year . That means half of the 8 million NYC residents make this and less. If we can get half of all housing in NYC be available and affordable to people making $51,100 a year and less, then you would be talking.

  • Charles Dale

    “In Manhattan, the median rental price rose 5.9 percent to $3,250, while the average fell 1.2 percent to $3,960. In Brooklyn, the median rental price rose 9 percent to $2,900, while the average rent declined 1.3 percent to $3,139.”

    That is too expensive for the median income of New York City which is $51,100. At the median income level, one would qualify for an apt. that rents for $1,200 a month. If you applied for the median rental priced apts. in Manhattan and Brooklyn You would not qualify if you made the median income of $51,100 a year or less.

    Uh oh..

  • Char4Dew

    I SAY it is more than Bloomberg did for affordable living or the middle class….
    And BD. has not been in office long.
    I am not going to vote for the 1% and some of the Brokers here are not anywhere near the 1% but seem to walk with eyes wide shut…
    LISTEN brokers once upon a time, REBNY was for us, and we had a great reputation, they are only lobbyist now, and the unethical works in this industry have spread.

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