The Real Deal New York

Tamarkin to build 12-story condo building near High Line

Property on West 29th Street slated to hold 32 apartments

February 27, 2015 11:29AM
By Claire Moses

From left: 550 West 29th Street, Cary Tamarkin and a rendering of 508 West 24th Street

From left: 550 West 29th Street, Cary Tamarkin and a rendering of 508 West 24th Street

Architect and developer Cary Tamarkin filed plans today for a 12-story condominium building in West Chelsea.

The plans for the new building at 550 West 29th Street, near the High Line, call for a 135-foot-tall structure that will span more than 55,000 square feet. The building is slated to have 32 apartments as well as a roughly 5,000-square-foot commercial space.

Goldstein, Hill & West Architects is serving as the architect of record.

Some of the units will be floor-through apartments, according to the plans. The building will also include two duplexes.

This isn’t Tamarkin’s only development along the High Line. At nearby 508 West 24th Street, Tamarkin developed a 15-unit condo building where units range in size from 2,000 to 3,000 square feet and in price between $4.2 million and $10 million.

The new building will likely include some of Tamarkin’s trademarks such as steel-banded windows.

Tamarkin has also been active in other parts of the city. In October, his firm Tamarkin Company paid $50 million for an Upper West Side church property owned by the Archdiocese of New York, as previously reported.

  • ragingagainst

    A beautiful little building torn down for another ‘high line’ boring glass box that will be surrounded by other huge glass boxes. The development of the area around the High Line will down down in NYC history as the most egregious missed opportunity and developer land-grab in NYC history.

  • Rob

    Since when has Tamarkin built ‘boring glass boxes’? He builds buildings with roots to the neighborhood. It will be the most Chelsea building in all of Chelsea most likely. You can blame some like Zaha, Selldorf, and Jean Nouvel for making museum looking spaceships.

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