The Real Deal New York

Robert Olnick’s massive art collection to be auctioned

The works could fetch up to $20M

October 21, 2016 10:17AM

Pieces in Robert Olnick's art collection (clockwise from left: An acrylic and graphite-on-canvas work from 1983 by Agnes Martin, Despair, from 1979, by Roy Lichtenstein, Double Mirror, from 1970, by Roy Lichtenstein and a 1983 patinated bronze sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein) (credit: Christie's)

Pieces in Robert Olnick’s art collection (clockwise from left: An acrylic and graphite-on-canvas work from 1983 by Agnes Martin, Despair, from 1979, by Roy Lichtenstein, Double Mirror, from 1970, by Roy Lichtenstein and a 1983 patinated bronze sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein) (credit: Christie’s)

The children of the late real estate titan Robert Olnick are auctioning off most of his and his wife’s massive art collection next month.

The trove — which totals 58 items — is expected to fetch north of $20 million at Christie’s in New York in November, Bloomberg reported. Olnick, who founded his development company in 1946 and bought a controlling interest in what later became Starrett City TRData LogoTINY, collected modern art with his wife, Sylvia. After he died in 1986, she continued to bulk up their collection, increasingly turning to more contemporary artists like Barbara Kruger and Cindy Sherman. Sylvia died earlier this year, and so now their two daughters are selling most of their collection.

The collection includes “Untitled #6” by Agnes Martin, which is said to be worth between $5 million to $7 million. Another item is a sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein called “Sleeping Muse,” which is expected to sell for $3.5 million to $5.5 million.

In August 2015, The Real Deal profiled some of the real estate world’s most avid art collectors, including Aby Rosen and Edward Minskoff. In September, developer Michael Shvo was indicted on tax evasion charges related to his extensive art collection. Months earlier, Rosen agreed to pay $7 million to settle claims he didn’t pay taxes on sales of art work. [Bloomberg]Kathryn Brenzel

MENU