The Real Deal New York

Posts Tagged ‘community board 2’

  • The United Talmudic Academy at 25 Waverly Avenue

    The United Talmudic Academy at 25 Waverly Avenue in Brooklyn

    A community board in Clinton Hill denied a permit application from a local yeshiva to operate as a school in an industrial zone. [more]

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  • 500-atlantic-avenue-boerum-hill

    From left: 500 Atlantic Avenue and 202 Flatbush Avenue

    WEEKENDEDITION After facing local opposition, a drug treatment center in Boerum Hill has been granted permission to move into its new Atlantic Avenue location by Brooklyn’s Community Board 2, but with one condition: its front has to be “attractive.” [more]

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  • From left: Squibb Park and Beastie Boy Adam Yauch

    A group of residents in Brooklyn Heights say the neighborhood’s Squibb Park should change its name to honor the late Beastie Boy Adam Yauch, aka MCA, the Brooklyn Paper reported. Squibb Park, which has a skate park and will one day serve as the entryway for a bridge linking the neighborhood to Brooklyn Bridge Park, should be named for a local, not 19th-century pharmaceutical pioneer Edward Robinson Squibb, the residents say. [more]

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  • From left: Community Board 2 Chairman Brad Hoylman, Alicia Hurley, NYU's vice president of government affairs, and NYU's expansion plan

    An ambitious plan to expand New York University’s Greenwich Village campus by 2.5 million square feet was unanimously rejected by Community Board 2 during a raucous hearing last night where residents and local community activists roundly criticized the proposal.

    The board approved a resolution, which will be posted on its website this morning, blasting nearly every phase of NYU’s so-called 2031 plan, which would take nearly two decades to complete. [more]

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  • When the developers of Trump Soho built the 46-story hotel-condo in Hudson Square, they were allowed to build 20 percent bigger than zoning would typically allow by vowing to build an 8,161-square-foot plaza. According to the Villager, one year after the building opened, the developers now want to take back some of that space for outdoor seating for the Quatro restaurant on the hotel’s ground floor. Trump Soho representatives presented the plan before Community Board 2, which plays an advisory role in the City Planning Commission’s decision, arguing that the plaza attracts little public use and the cafe would invite people into the public space. … [more]

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  • The city has launched its public review process for a preservationist-friendly rezoning of a 31-block swath of Brooklyn’s Boerum Hill that would discourage out-of-scale building and prevent commercial development from intruding onto residential blocks in the neighborhood, City Planning Commissioner Amanda Burden announced today. The proposal covers the mostly rowhouse-filled blocks bounded by Atlantic Avenue to the north, Fourth Avenue to the east, Warren and Wyckoff streets to the south and Court Street to the west, Burden said. TRD[more]

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  • While pop-up shops have become popular among landlords looking to secure temporary tenants during the economic downturn, Soho’s Community Board 2 isn’t thrilled with some of the pop-up tenants that have opened up shop in its neighborhood, according to Eater. The board, which claims the non-permanent tenants have become a menace, plans to hash out the issue of pop-up shops and restaurants at Thursday’s community meeting. The group has already begun distributing fliers that claim pop-up establishments are setting a “dangerous precedent” that could “become the new backdoor means by which an eating and drinking establishment obtains their liquor license without going through the proper legal procedures.” [Eater]

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  • Adam Weinberg, director of the Whitney, and a rendering of the museum (credit: Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Cooper, Robertson & Partners)


    The Whitney Museum of American Art will break ground on its new downtown site May 24, with the project slated for completion in 2015, museum officials announced last night during a Community Board 2 meeting. With 70 percent of the funds raised for the project, demolition is scheduled to begin in February. Whitney’s director, Adam Weinberg, was on hand at the West Village meeting to present the newest plans for the 200,000-square foot building, which will be located at the southernmost entrance of the High Line, in the Meatpacking District. Weinberg noted that the museum’s move downtown is a “return to our roots in the Village,” since the Whitney originally started out on West 8th Street in the 1930s. … [more]

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  • Greenwich Village residents are making a renewed push to keep three parcels of land out of the reach of an expanding New York University by transferring their control from the city’s Department of Transportation to the Department of Parks and Recreation, according to the Daily News. Community Board 2 has already orchestrated several unsuccessful attempts at the transfer, but this time, amid the school’s 2031 expansion plan, Villagers are stepping up their efforts, having already sent out petitions to Mayor Bloomberg, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer and Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe. NYU has said it wants to take the blocks where the land parcels — including the Mercer Playground, LaGuardia Park and the Mercer-Houston Dog Run — are located and “knit them back into the city.” [NYDN]

    [more]

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  • NYU’s Alicia Hurley and a rendering of the proposed fourth tower (building in the middle)

    “Overtaxing,” “disturbing,” “untenable” and “a misfit for the community” were some of the choice words used last night by Greenwich Village residents to describe New York University’s expansion plans, particularly the school’s proposal to build a 38-story [more]

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  • NYU’s Alicia Hurley and a rendering of the proposed fourth tower (building in the middle)

    “Overtaxing,” “disturbing,” “untenable” and “a misfit for the community” were some of the choice words used last night by Greenwich Village residents to describe New York University’s expansion plans, particularly the school’s proposal to build a 38-story [more]

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  • Robert Toll and a rendering of 205 Water Street

    Toll Brothers’ planned residential tower on Dumbo’s Water Street cleared the first phase of the public review process when a Community Board 2 committee approved the project’s design in an 8-3 vote last night. Toll Brothers’ plans call for 67 market-rate apartments and 86 underground parking spaces. Current zoning in the district allows for up to 12-story buildings and does not have the 20 percent affordable housing requirement that other areas of Brooklyn have, so the steel and gray concrete project at 205 Water Street glided through the vote easily. “We loved the gritty nature of this industrial area, and that was our inspiration,” said Navid Maqami of Greenberg Farrow, which designed the project. Toll Brothers, which recently abandoned its long-planned Gowanus Canal development after it garnered a Superfund designation from the Environmental Protection Agency, will now need to win approval from the full community board before an April 6 vote by the Landmarks Commission. [Brooklyn Paper][more]

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  • The officials in charge of the new $350 million Brooklyn Bridge Park know what New Yorkers want — and that’s an outdoor wine bar and plaza along the water. The Brooklyn Bridge Park Development Corporation, which is overseeing the 1.7-mile Dumbo park until the city takes over, is planning a plaza with four concessions at Pier 1, one of which will be an elevated wine bar, the group told Community Board 2’s Parks and Recreation Committee last night. “We’re looking for concessions that cater to everyone — and one of the biggest questions we got during the design phase was, ‘Where can I drink publicly in your park?’” said David Lowin, a vice president with the corporation. The plaza, bordered by Old Fulton Street, the waterfront and the Brooklyn Bridge, would also include fare like hot dogs and snacks. The corporation has already sought proposals for Pier 1 and plans to do so for Pier 6, which would have two more cart concessions plus a restaurant with rooftop access, in the coming weeks. Concessions at both piers would open by July. [Brooklyn Paper]

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  • Toll Brothers is looking to build as high as it can get away with on its new 205 Water Street site in new Dumbo Historic District. The luxury home builder bought the vacant site for $8.6 million in December. Toll has a 120-foot, 70-unit tower in mind, but needs approval from the Landmarks Preservation Commission before moving forward. The neighborhood was rezoned last year, putting a 12-story limit on residential construction. “We’re going back and forth on height at this point,” said David Von Spreckelsen, a spokesperson for Toll. “If there were no Landmarks Commission, we’d go to 12 stories without question.” Toll has yet to give any clues as to what the building would look like. The site, on Plymouth and Water streets, had briefly been considered for the middle school component of David Walentas’ Brooklyn Bridge project, which was ultimately moved to Dock Street and approved last year after a long battle with Community Board 2. [Brooklyn Paper]

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  • Formerly thought of as an industrial haven, the Hunters Point neighborhood of Long Island City is snapping up retailers and restaurants, transforming the area into a residential-friendly nabe, according to residents. Joseph Conley, chair person of the Community Board 2 in Queens, said that the Hunters Point community has been pushing for a residential rebirth, and that the movement is paying off. “We’ve seen a tsunami of residential development,” Conley said. “To attract even more residents… we’re looking for more of those amenities that people would be looking for in a typical [residential] area.” Contrary to much of the city, which has been seeing more big-box retailers move in, the majority of the new retailers and eateries in Hunters Point are small businesses, according to community members, such as the Breadbox Café, which recently opened in a former auto mechanic’s space.

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  • The 11-acre park planned for Long Island City’s new Hunters Point South waterfront development may come up short on natural beauty. A recently-released design reveals that the city wants to cover the park’s large lawn with artificial turf in order to minimize necessary maintenance. Real grass, Parks Department officials told community members at a recent public hearing, attracts geese and needs to be replanted on a regular basis. Nonetheless, many residents are hoping for the real thing, noting that artificial turf gets too hot to use during the summer. Additional park amenities include a water taxi at the end of Second Street that will bring commuters to Manhattan, a bike path, rehabilitated pier and a kayak launch. Community Board 2 will review the project further before the design is approved. [NYDN]

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  • The City Planning Commission is planning a proposal for an area within the Greenwich Village Historic District that would limit the height of any new construction and do away with a development bonus currently offered for commercial projects there, the city said last week. Last year, developer Charles Blaichman submitted plans for a new seven-and-a-half-story hotel at the corner of Perry and Washington streets, and the Landmarks Preservation Commission gave him the go-ahead. If City Planning’s rezoning is passed before Blaichman breaks ground — via a review and hearing by Community Board 2 and final approval by the City Council — his hotel will have to be scrapped. As it stands, the six-block section, between Greenwich and Washington streets and West 10th and 12th streets, is a C6-1 zone, which means there is no height limit for new projects. The Commission’s plan to change the area to a C1-6A district will be welcomed by the Greenwich Village Society of Historic Preservation and by Community Board 2. Both groups have lobbied for stricter zoning regulations like the one proposed. [The Villager]

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  • CB 2, residents spar over triangle plans

    October 23, 2009 10:54AM

    Although Community Board 2 has, largely, thrown its support behind the redesign of the St. Vincent’s Triangle, the plans drawn up by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates have caused many residents to question whether the ambitious park design is sustainable. An advocacy group known as Waverly Bank 11 Neighbors says it’s concerned that St. Vincent’s won’t be able to maintain the new West Village park and that the 24-hour operational schedule could raise safety problems. But Jo Hamilton, chair of Community Board 2, said that the current triangle is a waste of space in desperate need of an overhaul. “When we tried 30 years ago to design the triangle, it ended up as an elevated garden not available to the public,” Hamilton said. “It was a great loss. This plan reflects what we think is most important, that the park will be at grade.”

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  • Another strip club may be coming to Long Island City, whether local community board members like it or not. GLC Entertainment, the company that owns Sin City in the Bronx, is seeking a liquor license for its property near the Queensboro Bridge, despite previous reports that its plan to open a club in the spot had been abandoned. Community Board 2 members had believed their initial opposition to owner Gus Drakopoulos’ attempt to obtain a liquor license had curtailed his plans to turn his two-story brick building, which used to house Smiley’s Flowers, into another Sin City-like venture. Now both Drakopoulos and the Liquor Authority are saying Drakopoulos never withdrew the application. Construction plans for the venue show 12 karaoke rooms and a main lounge with two cash bars on the lower floor, a service bar on the upper floor, and a maximum occupancy of 299 people.This isn’t the first time Long Island City community leaders have butted heads with strip club owners in the area. As The Real Deal first reported Scandals, at 24-03 Queens Plaza North, is suing the city and the
    Department of Buildings for trying to remove its authorization to
    operate as an adult club in that location.

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  • The developer of a Soho office building is no longer requesting a
    zoning variance to build an 11-story structure at 330 West
    Broadway at Grand Street. The planned structure, which was criticized
    by Community Board 2 and the
    Soho Alliance, would have been a 55 percent increase in bulk over what
    is permitted by the current zoning. The property’s owner, John De
    Lorenzo and Bro Iron, is currently engaged in litigation with the
    developer, West Broadway 330 LLC, for allegedly failing to provide
    payments after agreeing to put down a $500,000 deposit. The developer
    has filed a counterclaim, charging that De Lorenzo violated the deal’s
    confidentiality agreement after news of the deal’s collapse became
    public. … [more]

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