The Real Deal Miami

Author of “Die Rich” sells Boca manse for $5.75M

Buyer is descendant from wealthy 19th century banking dynasty

February 23, 2016 06:00PM
By Sean Stewart-Muniz

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The home at 17791 Saxony Court in Boca Raton

The home at 17791 Saxony Court in Boca Raton

Barry Kaye, a former insurance whiz and the author of hallowed tomes like “Die Rich and Tax Free,” just sold his golf course mansion in Boca Raton for $5.75 million to a member of the famed Rothschild family.

This castle-like home is located on just over an acre at 17791 Saxony Court in the exclusive St. Andrews Country Club. Its style is French Regency, which is hallmarked by features like a grand main entryway and wrought-iron balconies.

The home's pool courtyard

The home’s pool courtyard

The Kaye family first purchased the waterfront property in 2002 for a mere $800,000, and built their home two years later.

Selling agent Mark Nestler of Nestler Poletto Sotheby’s described the home’s dining room as “palatial,” and its outdoor sculpture garden as “exquisite.” The residence measures 12,162 square feet and houses seven bedrooms, nine bathrooms and one half-bath. Among its features: wood and marble flooring, a “gentleman’s” library, cinema-style home theater and private his-and-hers bathrooms for the master bedroom.

Kaye was the center of a 2010 lawsuit filed by a South Florida couple, who alleged Kaye defrauded them after they put him in charge of planning their financial estate. According to the Palm Beach Post, he gives regular seminars on “how to die rich.”

An aerial view of the home's 1.2-acre lot

An aerial view of the home’s 1.2-acre lot

He set his asking price at nearly $10 million in late 2015, though it appears the market whittled him down after six months.

The buyers are Edouard de La Tour d’Auvergne-Lauraguais and his wife Elizabeth Anne Harris.

According to website VirtualGlobetrotting, which tracks celebrity real estate deals, de La Tour d’Auvergne is a descendent of the famed Rothschild dynasty, which was believed to be the world’s richest family when it reached its peak in the 19th century.

Though their wealth has reportedly declined in modern years, Forbes still rates their combined net worth at $1.5 billion.

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