City Council to vote on extending permits for stalled development projects

New York /
Oct.October 13, 2009 09:17 AM

A new law would allow developers to renew expired building permits if they adhere to strict safety requirements while their construction projects are on hold, City Council members announced Monday. Currently, developers have only 12 months before their suspended or not-yet-begun construction plans lose their permits, but the new Department of Buildings program would extend that period to four years, provided a detailed safety monitoring and inspection plan is implemented. The program is intended both to aid struggling new developments and to maintain safety in the areas surrounding stalled project sites, said City Council speaker Christine Quinn, who made the announcement. “If these sites are not properly maintained, they can become safety hazards to residents and even havens of criminal activity,” Quinn said. “Our legislation will require enhanced site maintenance while construction is halted and allow projects to avoid delays when economic conditions improve.” A vote on the proposal is scheduled for Wednesday. [Crain’s]


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