Council okays Broadway Triangle rezoning

New York /
Dec.December 22, 2009 09:27 AM

In a 36-4 vote yesterday, the City Council approved a controversial rezoning proposal by the Department of Housing Preservation and Development for Brooklyn’s long-blighted Broadway Triangle, a 31-acre parcel of land in East Williamsburg, near the borders of Bedford-Stuyvesant and Bushwick. The land is currently zoned for manufacturing, but the plan will convert it to a residential community with 1,851 units of housing, more than 800 of which would be for low- and moderate-income families. The rezoning was approved this summer by the local community board, and yesterday was the last day that the City Council could vote on the project, which has been met with harsh criticism over the past two years. Some say the plan does not do enough to address the area’s growing need for affordable housing, while others charge that the city granted early development rights to the United Jewish Organizations of Williamsburg and the Bushwick Ridgewood Senior Citizens Council, without providing any opportunity for competitive bidding. Martin Needelman, a lawyer for several groups that oppose the plan, said he would file a lawsuit today to block the decision. [NYT]


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
rikers island, 1422 Greene Avenue
Menachem Stark’s brother does jail time for neglecting units
Menachem Stark’s brother does jail time for neglecting units
Eric Adams, Kim Darga
Basement apartment pilot fizzles, showing need for state action
Basement apartment pilot fizzles, showing need for state action
From left: Bruce Teitelbaum and Kristin Richardson Jordan along with the site of a rejected housing development on 145th Street and Lenox Avenue in Harlem (Getty, Google Maps)
Pol who sank Harlem housing project rallies against truck lot on property
Pol who sank Harlem housing project rallies against truck lot on property
RiseBoro Community Partnership CEO Scott Short and 75 Linden Street in Bushwick (Getty, RiseBoro Community Partnership, Google Maps)
RiseBoro’s passive house retrofits save landlord a bundle
RiseBoro’s passive house retrofits save landlord a bundle
From left: Judge Debra James, Elizabeth Street Garden's Joseph Riever, and Pennrose Development's CEO Mark H. Dambly (Getty, New York Courts, Elizabeth Street Garden, Pennrose Development)
Judge halts Elizabeth Street Garden development — for now
Judge halts Elizabeth Street Garden development — for now
From left: Arch Companies’ Jeff Simpson and Dan Saklakov with 1351 Dekalb Ave (Loopnet, Saklakov, Getty, Arch Companies)
Arch Companies resurrects troubled 421a projects in Bushwick
Arch Companies resurrects troubled 421a projects in Bushwick
From left: Assemblyperson Inez Dickens and Councilperson Kristin Richardson Jordan
Pol who killed Harlem project could face primary challenge
Pol who killed Harlem project could face primary challenge
Current state of 201-207 7th Avenue and rendering of new property (Nisha Shetty for The Real Deal, Amie Gross Architects, Getty)
These renters are buying new co-ops for $2,500. How is that possible?
These renters are buying new co-ops for $2,500. How is that possible?
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...