25,000 NYC homeowners at risk of losing stake in property

New York /
Feb.February 02, 2010 02:57 PM

The New York City Department of Finance has announced that it will notify 24,963 homeowners that they are at risk of having a lien sold on their property to a private collector, if they do not pay off outstanding property-related payments, such as real estate taxes and water or sewer charges. The list, which was also published in today’s New York Post, serves as a 90-day warning for property owners and aims to educate buyers on different payment programs available. About 80 percent of the properties on last year’s 90-day warning list avoided a lien sale, according to government records. Brooklyn led the five boroughs with the most properties on the list — approximately 11,000. Queens trailed in second place, with 7,000 properties at risk. The Bronx, Staten Island and Manhattan, meanwhile, saw approximately 4,130 properties, 1,700 properties, and 1,460 properties on the list, respectively. TRD


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