Three-plus roomies? You’re breaking the law.

TRD New York /
Mar.March 29, 2010 09:04 AM

Buried in the city’s housing maintenance code is a little-known law that has the potential to affect tens of thousands of New Yorkers: it’s illegal here for more than three unrelated people to live together in an apartment or house. But if a quick perusal of Craigslist roommate postings is any indication, the law, originally intended to encourage the conversion of boarding house brownstones back into family homes, is unlikely to have an affect at all. Just three citations related to the roommates law have been issued since July, according to the Department of Housing Preservation and Development, and enforcement in a city where sky-high rents force residents to live in rooms described as “unique dungeons” for $525 a month seems not only difficult but also insensitive. The Census Bureau’s 2008 American Community Survey found that close to 15,000 city homes had three or more unrelated roommates, a number that experts say is probably under-reported. Any amendment to the current roommates law would need to come by the City Council. [NYT]


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson and Mayor Bill de Blasio (Getty)

City’s housing plan suffers major blow in “painful” budget

City’s housing plan suffers major blow in “painful” budget
A rendering of The Dime at 209 Havemeyer Street in Brooklyn (Credit: Fogarty Finger)

New city rule requires luxury rental buildings to house homeless families

New city rule requires luxury rental buildings to house homeless families
(Credit: iStock)

What’s wrong with J-51? Plenty, landlord reps say

What’s wrong with J-51? Plenty, landlord reps say
Louise Carroll (Credit: Twitter)

De Blasio selects Louise Carroll as new
HPD chief

De Blasio selects Louise Carroll as new
HPD chief
19 Kingsland Avenue in Bushwick (Credit: Google Maps)

More tensions are rising over the city’s multifamily-transfer program

More tensions are rising over the city’s multifamily-transfer program
Big rent-stabilized landlord sees backlash over facial recognition

Big rent-stabilized landlord sees backlash over facial recognition

Big rent-stabilized landlord sees backlash over facial recognition
City taps developers, nonprofits for two Hudson Yards projects

City taps developers, nonprofits for two Hudson Yards projects

City taps developers, nonprofits for two Hudson Yards projects
HUD official Lynne Patton has moved into NYCHA housing

HUD official Lynne Patton has moved into NYCHA housing

HUD official Lynne Patton has moved into NYCHA housing
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...