General Growth files $8.5B restructuring plan

New York /
Jul.July 13, 2010 11:30 AM

South Street Seaport

General Growth Properties, the bankrupt owner of U.S. shopping malls, including the South Street Seaport, has filed its proposed reorganization plan with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York, the company announced today.

Per the filing, General Growth plans to exit Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in October after splitting into two separate, publicly traded companies: a new General Growth Properties and Spinco.

“New GGP will remain the second-largest shopping mall owner and operator in the country…and will focus on largely stable, income-producing shopping malls and other real estate assets” CEO Adam Metz said in a statement. “At the same time, Spinco will hold a diversified portfolio of properties with little debt and with near-, medium- and long-term development opportunities, including GGP’s master planned community segment and a series of mixed-use and mall development projects in premier locations,” he said.

Shareholders will receive common stock in both companies, which will be capitalized with a combined up to $8.55 billion infusion from Brookfield Asset Management, Fairholme Capital Management and Pershing Square Capital Management. The Teacher Retirement System of Texas has also invested $550 million in shares of the new General Growth Properties common stock at $10.25 per share, the company said. General Growth soundly rejected a buyout offer from competitor Simon Property Group earlier this year.

General Growth said it will satisfy its debt and other claims in full under the plan. A bankruptcy court hearing on the plan is slated for Aug. 19. TRD

 

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