Youngwoo’s 70 Pine up for landmarking

New York /
Mar.March 28, 2011 10:16 AM
70 Pine Street, Young Woo of Youngwoo & Associates

The 66-story Art Deco tower at 70 Pine Street, the former American International Group tower where developer Youngwoo & Associates is planning a partial condominium conversion, is going up for landmarking. According to the Post, the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission will hold a public hearing next month on the skyscraper, which was built by Clinton & Russel, Holton & George in 1932 and is currently the tallest building in Lower Manhattan. Peers of 70 Pine, like the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building and Donald Trump’s 40 Wall Street, all enjoy protection as landmarks, meaning any changes to their structures must be first approved by the LPC. Youngwoo, which purchased the property from AIG in 2009 in a $150 million deal that also included the neighboring 72 Wall Street, is leasing out the lower floors as office space while planning luxury condos for the upper portion of the building. [Post]


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
The Strand Bookstore and store owner Nancy Bass Wyden (Credit: Getty Images)
Over owner’s protests, city landmarks Strand bookstore
Over owner’s protests, city landmarks Strand bookstore
Revamped design for 550 Madison receives Landmarks’ approval
Revamped design for 550 Madison receives Landmarks’ approval
Revamped design for 550 Madison receives Landmarks’ approval
The Top 10 preservation fights of 2018
The Top 10 preservation fights of 2018
The Top 10 preservation fights of 2018
The Howard Hughes Corporation CEO David O'Reilly (LinkedIn via David O'Reilly)
Howard Hughes’ (slightly less) big Seaport project approved
Howard Hughes’ (slightly less) big Seaport project approved
A rendering of 250 Water Street, Landmarks Preservation Commission chair Sarah Carroll and Howard Hughes Corporation CEO David O’Reilly (Center for Architecture, The Howard Hughes Corporation/SOM)
Howard Hughes told to further refine Seaport tower proposal
Howard Hughes told to further refine Seaport tower proposal
Howard Hughes Corporation CEO David O’Reilly and 250 Water Street (The Howard Hughes Corporation/SOM)
Critics look down on shorter 250 Water Street
Critics look down on shorter 250 Water Street
Previous rendering of 250 Water Street (left) and a new rendering (right) with Howard Hughes Corporation CEO David O’Reilly (The Howard Hughes Corporation/SOM)
Howard Hughes hopes smaller Seaport project will work this time
Howard Hughes hopes smaller Seaport project will work this time
The Down Town Association at 60-64 Pine Street (Wikipedia Commons, iStock/Illustration by Alexis Manrodt for The Real Deal)
Down Town Association files for bankruptcy
Down Town Association files for bankruptcy
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...