UES residents accuse MTA of withholding Second Avenue Subway-related testing results

TRD New York /
Feb.February 20, 2012 03:30 PM

Residents of townhouses in the Treadwell Farms Historic District of Manhattan, which spans Second to Third avenues from 63rd to 60th streets, are growing frustrated because of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s lack of response to their complaints about ongoing underground blasting for the Second Avenue Subway.

According to NY1, the MTA finally installed vibration monitoring devices on some of the homes in the district after complaints of structural damage, but it is now allegedly refusing to share results from the testing with residents.

The MTA said that the blasting is below levels declared safe by the Department of Buildings and that data will be given to the homeowners in due course.

“What if something fell off a wall, something fell on a child,” said resident Julianne Bertagna. “I know there have been people in the neighborhood who have said that light fixtures have fallen out of the ceilings or lamps have fallen off their walls.”

With historic homes, there’s an added danger in threatening the buildings structurally, said the homeowners’ attorney Arthur Goldstein.

“When you’re dealing with historic homes, if damage is too extensive an insurance check is not necessarily going to replace history,” he said. “We just don’t know how extensive the damage will be with another two months at levels of blasting that are just too high.” [NY1]


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
The MTA says it has the funding to extend the Second Avenue Subway to East Harlem, and the real estate industry is thrilled. (Credit: Getty, iStock)

Developers see dollar signs in Second Avenue subway extension

From left: 1800 and 1815 Park Avenue, MTA's Second Avenue Subway plan, and 160 East 125th Street between 3rd and Lexington (Credit: Google Maps)

Second Ave subway’s next phase could impact Durst, Extell dev sites

Peter Fine pays nearly $30M for East Harlem site along the Second Avenue subway’s next phase

Peter Fine pays nearly $30M for East Harlem site along the Second Avenue subway’s next phase

Rents are falling in Manhattan. But they keep climbing in this neighborhood

Rents are falling in Manhattan. But they keep climbing in this neighborhood

Izaki Group plans condos at UES development site

Izaki Group plans condos at UES development site

Premier, Thor plan 31-story UES condo on Third Avenue

Premier, Thor plan 31-story UES condo on Third Avenue

UNITED STATES - APRIL 12:  A map of the New York City subway with the addition of the 2nd Avenue subway line, blue line at right, hangs on display during the ground breaking ceremony for the 2nd Avenue subway in New York, Thursday, April 12, 2007. New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority broke ground on the $17 billion Second Avenue Subway this morning -- for the third time since it was first proposed in the early 20th century.  (Photo by Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sizing up the Second Avenue subway bump: Q&A, Part III

UNITED STATES - APRIL 12:  A map of the New York City subway with the addition of the 2nd Avenue subway line, blue line at right, hangs on display during the ground breaking ceremony for the 2nd Avenue subway in New York, Thursday, April 12, 2007. New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority broke ground on the $17 billion Second Avenue Subway this morning -- for the third time since it was first proposed in the early 20th century.  (Photo by Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sizing up the Second Avenue subway bump: Q&A, Part II

arrow_forward_ios
Loading...