Landmarks Commission threatens legal action over Sunset Park property

New York /
Aug.August 27, 2012 12:00 PM

A long-vacant, landmarked Sunset Park property is now the subject of a feud between a non-profit organization and the Landmarks Preservation Commission. The Brooklyn Chinese-American Association says it aims to make repairs to the former 68th Police Precinct Station House and Stable at 4302 and 4310 Fourth Avenue, but can’t raise the money. At the same time, the LPC says it is ready to pursue legal action unless the non-profit starts making repairs — and fast.

The BCAA purchased the building for just over $200,000 in 1999. Paul Mak, the group’s founder, told the Daily News he still wants to turn the stable section of the 19th-century building into a youth center. Mak’s organization has come close on two occasions to nabbing a total of $3 million in grant money for restoration, but the deals fell through.

Now, due to complaints from neighbors and over $70,000 in fines over the past 11 years, the LPC is threatening a demolition by neglect suit. “We are prepared to pursue legal action unless the owner takes the necessary steps to repair this historic building,” an LPC spokesperson told the Daily News.

However, a separate $25,000 LPC grant for which BCAA applied to use for fixes was reportedly rejected by the commission.

“They want us to fix it but are not giving any financial support,” Mak told the Daily News. [NYDN] — Zachary Kussin


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