Woolworth mansion cuts rental price to $150,000

TRD New York /
Sep.September 04, 2012 01:30 PM

Manhattan’s priciest residential townhouse listing can now be rented for $150,000 per month, the Observer reported. The famed Woolworth mansion, located at 4 East 80th Street in the Upper East Side, hit the market a year and a half ago, asking $90 million or $210,000 a month. The rental price was first trimmed in April of last year to $165,000. The rent slash comes as competition for other astronomically priced residences, such as 15 Central Park West and 50 Central Park South, both boasting $95 million listings, hit the market.

“It would be the only renovated townhouse at this size on the market,” Paula Del Nunzio, who currently has the listing at Brown Harris Stevens, said.

The seven-story, 19,950-square-foot townhouse was one of three palatial homes built by Frank Winfield Woolworth for his daughters. The house was completed in 1916 by architect Charles Pierpont Henry Gilbert, and has flourishes like 14-foot ceilings, a 50-seat dining room, a wood-paneled library and a fifth-floor gym. Its most recent owner was popular exercise chain owner Lucille Roberts.

As The Real Deal previously reported, if the Woolworth mansion gets its asking price it would shatter the record for the most expensive residential townhouse sale in New York City history[NYO] – Christopher Cameron


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