BPC turf, which cost millions, is beyond repair

TRD New York /
Dec.December 21, 2012 03:00 PM

A plot of artificial turf ball field located in Battery Park City, which sustained serious flooding during Hurricane Sandy, will have to be replaced entirely, the Broadsheet Daily reported. As of yet, there is no estimate available regarding funding or the time needed to reconstruct the area, located on the West Side Highway between Murray and Warren streets.

The Battery Park City Authority made the decision and, according to a statement, “has begun [the] procurement process for a contractor.”

The cost to assemble the fields in 2011 reached $4.1 million. The Broadsheet said that when the project gets on its feet, the cost is likely to be hefty. In addition, two years of discussions and preparations went into opening the fields.

As of now, the scope of what this project includes is unclear and will likely not be available until the field is entirely removed. [Broadsheet Daily, top item]Zachary Kussin


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