City defends its Rapid Repairs program

TRD New York /
Dec.December 27, 2012 11:00 AM

Amid unprecedented demand for repair services and a shortage of electricians, Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s press secretary, Marc La Vorgna, defended the city’s efforts in its Rapid Repairs program, NY1 reported. Dubbed NYC Rapid Repairs, the program was established in the wake of Hurricane Sandy to provide free emergency repairs, including fixes to heat, power, hot water and other services, to affected property owners.

But since its November launch, the program has been criticized for taking too long. According to published reports, over 10,000 affected homeowners signed up for the service. La Vorgna told NY1 that since it started, the program has put 4,000 people back in their homes and that contractors are now working to get another 1,500 units back in working order.

“We went out, took responsibility for this, something no other city has ever done,” La Vorgna told NY1. “No other state, no other municipality, no other county, whatever it is, has ever said ‘OK, we’re gonna help you get this done,’ as opposed to saying ‘OK, talk to FEMA, let them write you a check. You go off and Google a plumber and Google a contractor and find a way to get it done, or find your electrician that way.”

La Vorgna did not have an end date for the program. [NY1]Zachary Kussin


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