Numbers to know: 111 Central Park North has the most expensive listings in Harlem, NYC is one of the priciest places to have a baby … and more

New York /
Aug.August 15, 2013 01:00 PM

“Numbers to know” is a weekly web feature that catalogues the most notable, quirky and surprising real estate statistics. New York City is the third most expensive city to have a kid, the Post Towers gets a makeover, and 111 Central Park North has the priciest listings in Harlem — which still seem like a Manhattan bargain.

$4.975 million
Asking price of the supposed oldest wooden lighthouse in the U.S., a four-bedroom, 4.5-bath home in North Kingstown, R.I. [Zillow]

$2.6 million
State funds going towards improving state park golf courses under New York’s “I Love NY Golf” program [Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Office]

$36,700

Costs of a baby’s first year in New York City, which ranked as the third most expensive city in the country to have a baby; the first was San Jose, Calif. [Redfin]

17,944

Population of Sharon, Mass., which Trulia ranked as the best place in the country to live [Trulia]

$1,481
Price per square foot for listings at 111 Central Park North — the building with the priciest listings in Harlem [CityRealty]

206
Units in the Post Towers at 75 West Street, which Skyline Developers recently spent over $1 million renovating [Skyline Developers]

182
Days on the market for the average Manhattan apartment listed for $4 million and above [Olshan Luxury Market Report]

50

Length in feet of a wall in Downtown Brooklyn’s Future Plaza, which will be transformed into a leafy, green wall by high school students today [Downtown Brooklyn Partnership]

3.1
Percentage price increase in three-bedroom apartments between June and July, from $6,178 per square foot to $6,368 per square foot [Coldwell Banker AC Lawrence]

3

Months the average U.S. homebuyer spends searching for a home [DoorSteps]


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