Williamsburg is realm of hipsterdom: Census

New York /
Sep.September 13, 2013 10:05 AM

Young people in their late twenties who fashion themselves as outside of the mainstream — derisively referred to as hipsters — are a major force in New York, especially trendy neighborhoods like Williamsburg, Brooklyn. 

But how did they get there? Where do they all come from?

Fortunately these questions can be answered by the U.S. Census Bureau. Looking at their flows mapper — which measures people moving to or from a county to any other counties — we were able to find out where people were coming from when they moved to Brooklyn.

Not only that, but we were also able to narrow down the age ranges.

This map shows counties that had a significant number of people aged 25-30 who moved to Kings County, New York, also known as Brooklyn. These are prime candidates for hipsterdom.

The grey areas on the map indicate regions where there are people moving from there to Brooklyn, but the Census doesn’t have evidence to say they’re between 25 and 30. The orange areas, though, are where a bunch of people are coming from.

So while we’re not saying that all people between 25 and 30 who are moving from the rest of the country to Brooklyn are hipsters, this fits the bill.

There’s mostly a ton of movement from the rest of the city and entire New York tri-state area, as well as California.

If you look closer, you can also see that Brooklyn is bringing in people from Portland, Seattle, Salt Lake City, Austin, and the Research Triangle in North Carolina.

So next time you want to bash New York Hipsters, just realize that it’s not New York that’s the cause. It’s all of you.


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Matt Lauer exposes Hamptons estate to the market
Matt Lauer exposes Hamptons estate to the market
Matt Lauer exposes Hamptons estate to the market
 Fredrik Eklund and the property (Getty, Steve Frankel)
Fredrik Eklund lists Bel Air mansion for rent as family moves to “forever home”
Fredrik Eklund lists Bel Air mansion for rent as family moves to “forever home”
Gordon Ramsey and his Lucky Cat restaurant (Lucky Cat)
Gordon Ramsay to open first South Florida restaurant in Miami Beach
Gordon Ramsay to open first South Florida restaurant in Miami Beach
“Nothing has changed”: Judges thwart evictions of nonpaying tenants
“Nothing has changed”: Judges thwart evictions of nonpaying tenants
“Nothing has changed”: Judges thwart evictions of nonpaying tenants
Sam Zell with a RVC Outdoor Destinations site (Getty, RVC)
Sam Zell’s Equity Lifestyle Properties invests $147M in manufactured homes
Sam Zell’s Equity Lifestyle Properties invests $147M in manufactured homes
From left: Caren Maio, Blima Ehrentreu, David Abrams, David Schechtman and Justin Ehrlich
Proptech stars — they’re just like us: Future City attendee spotlight
Proptech stars — they’re just like us: Future City attendee spotlight
Richard Wagman, managing partner, Madison Capital (Care/of, Madison Capital, iStock)
Madison Capital signs wellness company in Brooklyn office
Madison Capital signs wellness company in Brooklyn office
Reza Merchant and 555 Broadway (Google Maps, LinkedIn)
The Collective unloads Williamsburg dev site to avoid foreclosure
The Collective unloads Williamsburg dev site to avoid foreclosure
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...