Entitled to housing tax break? City’s fuzzy words confuse vets

TRD New York /
Sep.September 16, 2013 01:38 PM

The men and women who served in Iraq and Afghanistan should be getting a 15 percent break on their property taxes, but many aren’t because of bum information being handed out by city workers.

State law stipulates the exemption for all veterans of foreign wars, but New York City’s Department of Finance website doesn’t include Iraq and Afghanistan on its list of conflicts. The roster, though, does mention the “Mexican Border Period” in 1917, World Wars I and II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War and the “Persian Golf conflict.”

Iraq and Afghanistan vets are eligible for the tax relief, but that the wars are considered part of the “Persian Gulf Conflict,” which began in 1990 and continues today, finance spokesman Owen Stone told DNAinfo.

The city’s 311 dispatchers, though, are telling the vets that they don’t qualify for the exemption.

“I called and asked if they were eligible for the benefits and the woman said ‘No,'” said Alex Nicholson, legislative director for Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, who dialed the information center on Sept. 6 and on Sept. 9.

In response, Stone told DNAinfo that the agency would make sure 311 dispatchers gave the right answer from now on.

Even State Senator Daniel Squadron, who represents parts of northern and central Brooklyn, was under the impression that Iraq and Afghanistan vets are not eligible for the break. He introduced legislation to extend the benefits to veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan, but the proposal never got to the Senate floor for a vote. [DNAinfo]Julie Strickland


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
New York Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie and Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins (Getty)

New York lawmakers push for new millionaires’ tax

New York lawmakers push for new millionaires’ tax
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Schumer by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images; McConnell by Ting Shen/Xinhua via Getty)

Schumer v. McConnell on SALT: Who’s gonna give?

Schumer v. McConnell on SALT: Who’s gonna give?
Joe Biden (Getty)

Biden’s $775B “caring economy” plan to be funded by RE taxes

Biden’s $775B “caring economy” plan to be funded by RE taxes
Photo illustration of Governor Andrew Cuomo (Credit: Cuomo by Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images; iStock)

Escaping New York? Tax man is right behind you

Escaping New York? Tax man is right behind you
New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer (Credit: Andrew Burton/Getty Images, iStock)

Coronavirus will cost city billions in tax revenue: comptroller

Coronavirus will cost city billions in tax revenue: comptroller
Taxes would rise for owners of Manhattan mansions and penthouses, but the biggest shock would be on homeowners in Brooklyn neighborhoods (Credit: Pixabay)

City’s property tax overhaul would increase burden for single-family homeowners

City’s property tax overhaul would increase burden for single-family homeowners
Antonio Reynoso and 140 Devoe Street in Brooklyn (Credit: Google Maps)

Council closes tax-lien loophole that threatened property seizures

Council closes tax-lien loophole that threatened property seizures
Governor Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio (Credit: Getty Images)

Cuomo expects NYC to take lead on property tax reform

Cuomo expects NYC to take lead on property tax reform
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...