East Harlem blast victims scramble to find permanent housing

Mayor’s Fund rental assistance to expire in July

TRD New York /
May.May 22, 2014 12:15 PM

Two months after a pair of East Harlem buildings crumbled in the wake of an explosion, only two of the 13 displaced families have found permanent housing.

The Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City is paying the former residents’ rent for three months, sending those who still lack housing into a scramble to find new lodging, the Wall Street Journal reported.

“The biggest challenge that we hear is the people are frustrated that they haven’t found a permanent place to live,” Pura Cruz, an outreach coordinator with nonprofit LSA Family Health Service, told the Journal. “They’re anticipating help from [the city] and nothing really has happened.”

The city provided temporary housing in the wake of the blast.

Many of the blast victims want to stay in the neighborhood, but have low incomes and are surrounded by rising rents. In the two destroyed buildings, rents ranged from around $450 to $1,000 per month, with a few as low as $140 per month. Several were two or three-bedroom units. The average resident income, meanwhile, was about $25,900, according to Housing Preservation and Development Department data cited by the Journal.

“We are working with the families as well as our local sponsors to help identify permanent-housing options that meet the needs of each household,” a city Department of Housing Preservation and Development spokesperson told the paper, adding that the agency is also helping eligible families apply for rental assistance programs like Section 8. [WSJ]Julie Strickland


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
A rendering of 165 Broome Street (Credit: Handel Architects)

Nonprofit plans affordable housing development near Essex Crossing

Nonprofit plans affordable housing development near Essex Crossing
All Falls Down: Kanye West’s “Star Wars”-themed affordable housing plan hits snag

All Falls Down: Kanye West’s “Star Wars”-themed affordable housing plan hits snag

All Falls Down: Kanye West’s “Star Wars”-themed affordable housing plan hits snag
New York Attorney General Letitia James and 63-36 99th Street in Rego Park (Getty; StreetEasy)

“Not on my watch”: AG Tish James fines developers who violated 421a

“Not on my watch”: AG Tish James fines developers who violated 421a
902 Drew Street and 400 East 58th Street (Google Maps)

New York’s multifamily sales improve in Q3

New York’s multifamily sales improve in Q3
San Francisco Mayor London Breed (Getty)

San Francisco mayor blasts “lefty movement” for blocking housing

San Francisco mayor blasts “lefty movement” for blocking housing
Brooklyn Hospital Center at 121 DeKalb Avenue in Brooklyn (Credit: Google Maps)

Brooklyn Hospital Center’s $1B renovation could include 1K affordable units

Brooklyn Hospital Center’s $1B renovation could include 1K affordable units
Arker Companies principal Alex Arker and 51-19 Beach Channel Drive in Edgemere (Arker Companies; Google Maps)

Arker Companies begins massive redevelopment of former Queens hospital

Arker Companies begins massive redevelopment of former Queens hospital
Brooklyn’s Sunset Park is in the midst of a severe housing crisis and in desperate need of affordable housing. (Photo by Jim.henderson via Wikipedia)

Sunset Park faces severe affordable housing shortage: report

Sunset Park faces severe affordable housing shortage: report
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...