Midtown businesses follow Condé Nast Downtown

Restaurants, hair salons look to continue catering to the publisher's 2,300 employees

New York /
Jul.July 25, 2014 11:25 AM

The migration of 2,300 Condé Nast employees to 1 WTC will leave a gaping hole in the incomes of some Midtown businesses. As a result, a number of companies that cater to the publisher and its employees are following it downtown.

Among the merchants trying to make the move are the Lamb’s Club, a restaurant frequented by Condé Nast staff, and nail and hair salons that attend to the fashion-conscious employees’ beauty needs, The New York Times reported.

The publisher has also been instrumental in luring high-end retailers to the retail spaces at the World Trade Center, as The Real Deal previously reported.

Condé Nast’s gravitational pull is making it easier for brokers to convince tenants that Downtown has arrived, according to the Times.

“Condé Nast was a huge catalyst in the transformation and perception of downtown,” Ed Hogan, Brookfield’s national director of retail leasing, told the newspaper. [NYT]Tom DiChristopher


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