Here’s the Manhattan apartment farthest from the subway

It's 0.7 miles away from the closest subway entrance

TRD New York /
Oct.October 12, 2014 03:00 PM

Pratt Institute statistics professor and writer of the I Quant NY blog Ben Wellington combined subway entrance and land use data provided on the NYC government’s open data portal to make a heatmap showing how far away each residential building in Manhattan is from a subway entrance. Green is close to an entrance; red is far:

 

10 Gracie Square, indicated on the map, wins the dubious honor of being the Manhattan residential building farthest from a subway entrance. According to Wellington’s calculations, the nearest subway entrance is 0.7 miles away on a straight line path, or 0.8 Miles Following The Street grid. Walking at three miles per hour, 10 Gracie Square is 16 minutes from the subway.

Wellington also pointed out that there isn’t much of a discount on apartments in the building to compensate for the longer commute:

“My favorite part about the finding is that the Penthouse, which I guess is literally the farthest place you can live from the subway due to the longer ride down in the elevator, is currently on the market for $18.9 million, down from $23 million last year.   That’s right, you can pay $18.9 million dollars to have literally the longest walk to the subway in all of Manhattan!”

For more, including a Google document that shows the complete distance ranking for each residential address in the borough, check out Wellington’s post at I Quant NY here.



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