Cushman’s Glenn Markman dies at 52

Broker was leading advocate for Brooklyn's growth

TRD New York /
Nov.November 04, 2014 05:15 PM

Glenn Markman, a Cushman & Wakefield commercial broker who negotiated leases on behalf of Spike Lee and the Brooklyn Nets and became one of the industry’s leading advocates for Brooklyn’s growth, died today. He was 52.

The cause of death was cancer, according to a statement from Cushman & Wakefield, where Markman spent the last 12 years of his 28-year career in brokerage.

“Glenn distinguished himself through his work ethic, integrity and passion. We’re all very proud that he was part of our team and our deepest sympathies go out to his family and loved ones,” Cushman & Wakefield CEO Ed Forst said in a statement.

The Brooklyn native was a heavyweight dealmaker throughout Brooklyn. He helped relocate the Brooklyn Nets’ offices to 15 Metro Tech Center in Downtown Brooklyn, and negotiated the creation of a new, $45 million Nets training center in Sunset Park’s Industry City. 
In Manhattan, one of his most notable deals was the NBA’s 35,000-square-foot lease for a store at 666 Fifth Avenue.

Bruce Ratner, chairman of Forest City Ratner Companies, said when he met Markman 25 years ago, the two were drawn together by a shared vision of Brooklyn. “Most people had written the borough off, but Glenn, who was born and raised on its streets, was that rare and passionate believer who felt drawn to act,” Ratner said in a statement.

Bill Rudin, CEO of Rudin Management, said, “Glenn understood like few others the dynamism and vibrancy of New York City. He got Brooklyn before Brooklyn was cool.”

In addition to real estate, Markman helped launched BKLYN1834, an art incubator, and opened Heights Café in Brooklyn Heights as well as Dellarocco’s Authentic Neapolitan Pizzeria.

He is survived by his wife, Jan Testori-Markman, his son Clio and his daughter Edie Ray, as well as his parents Marty and Karen Markman, his brother Greg Markman and sister-in-law Margaret and their children, Nick, Andrew and Joey, his mother- and father-in-law Christine and Edward Testori, and his brother- and sister-in-law Jay and Susan Testori and their children Gina, Julia, Scott and Amber.


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