Sky-high in FiDi

A look at the latest crop of supertall residential projects Downtown

New York /
Apr.April 28, 2015 12:25 PM

UPDATED, 1:07 a.m., April 28: When thinking about supertall, record-breaking and gravity-defying residential towers in New York, the ones that first come to Mind Are 432 Park Avenue (the current record holder at 1,396 feet) and One57 (at 1,005 feet).

But before those skyscrapers sprouted up on what is now known as Billionaires’ Row, the city’s tallest residential tower could be found at 8 Spruce Street (870 feet). And while 8 Spruce, now known as New York by Gehry, had to relinquish its first-place spot, many of its new Financial District neighbors have similarly lofty ambitions.

From Michael Shvo and Bizzi & Partners 125 Greenwich Street (841 feet) to 42 Trinity Place (1,015 feet), here are some Downtown skyscrapers giving their Billionaires’ Row counterparts a run for their money.

50 West Street, 783 feet

Time Equities is developing a 64-story at this location. Thomas Juul-Hansen is designing the interior, while SLCE Architects is the architect of record. The tower reportedly will include 191 units across more than 400,000 square feet. Even though the tower — expected to rise 783 feet — won’t be tall enough to be considered “supertall,” it will still make its mark on the Downtown skyline.

42 Trinity Place, (potentially) 1,015 feet 

New renderings were released for Trinity Place Holdings’ project. While reports claimed that the developer added roughly 600,000 square feet of air rights to this project, a spokesperson for the developer said the project will be 300,000 square feet and roughly 500 feet tall. Studio C Architects’ renderings for the tower showed a supertall tower of least 80 stories and 1,015 feet tall, which would make it taller than Larry Silverstein’s 30 Park Place and 125 Greenwich. This development also includes the plans for a 29-story hotel at the long vacant, and adjacent, 50 Trinity Place.

30 Park Place, roughly 930 feet

One of the most anticipated Downtown towers is Larry Silverstein’s 30 Park Place. The 82-story tower, which was designed by Robert A.M. Stern Architects, includes 157 condominiums priced between $3.1 million and $60 million. With roughly 930 feet, it will be — at least for a little while — be the tallest residential tower in Downtown Manhattan.

New York by Gehry at 8 Spruce Street, 876 feet 

Before One57 And 432 Park Avenue arrived on the scene, 8 Spruce was city’s tallest residential building. The Forest City Ratner-developed 76-story rental building includes 899 units.

125 Greenwich Street, 841 feet  

Michael Shvo and Bizzi & Partners, with equity from Howard Lorber’s New Valley, are building a 841-foot tower at this FiDi location, according to a permit application from February. Rafael Vinoly is designing the tower, which will be tall, slim and glassy. SLCE Architects is the architect of record. The building will stand 71 stories tall. Earlier plans called for more than 1,350 feet, which would have made it the tallest Downtown residential tower and the second tallest in the city, after 432 Park. The supertall luxury tower will include 128 apartments, including 10 penthouses.

75 Nassau Street, 500 feet 

Metin Negrin’s Lexin Capital is building a 40-story mixed-use building in the Financial District that will rise almost 500 feet. Earlier reports claimed that the tower would stand at least 800 feet tall. The mixed-use skyscraper, designed by ODA Architecture, will include roughly 190,000 square feet of residential space.

Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly identified the developer of 42 Trinity Place. The Developer Is Trinity Place Holdings.


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