“Primates of Park Avenue” author’s RE dealings poke holes in narrative

Public records show that author Wednesday Martin spent less time on the UES than claimed in her memoir

TRD New York /
Jun.June 07, 2015 07:31 PM

Author Wednesday Martin’s new book “Primates of Park Avenue,” an exposé on life and parenting amongst Manhattan’s elite, has been the talk of the town. But some of the facts, including details about Martin’s real estate dealings, seem to be crumbling.

The New York Post recently scrutinized Martin’s book and found a number of eyebrow-raising discrepancies. To begin, Martin claims in the memoir that she spent six years “doing field work” on the Upper East. However, Martin only lived in the neighborhood for three years, according to the Post.

She also writes that she and her husband moved from the West Village for her toddler son. She recalls being made to interview for the purchase of her Park Avenue co-op in her bedroom, because of a difficult pregnancy. She describes herself propped up in bed wearing a strand of pearls while the co-op board surrounded her.

Yet, property records show reveal that she bought an apartment at 900 Park Avenue in January 2004 – a time when she does not seem to have been pregnant. (Her sons were born in 2001 and 2007).

Public records also show that Martin and her husband, Joel Moser, sold their Park Avenue pad for a $1 million profit in June 2007, three and half years after arriving — not six.

They moved to a $3.7 million co-op apartment on the Upper West Side, according to the Post. [NYP] Christopher Cameron


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