Landmarks commits to voting on Bed-Stuy historic district

Bedford area contains about 800 buildings and four designated landmarks

New York /
Jun.June 09, 2015 02:25 PM

Bedford-Stuyvesant is changing quickly, but if proponents of a new historic district have their way, at least the 19th-century brownstones will be preserved. And that dream is now one step closer to reality, with the Landmarks Preservation Commission agreeing to vote on the proposed Bedford Historic District within the next year.

Brooklyn Community Board 3 members said that they received word of the commitment from the commission’s executive director Sarah Carroll on May 26, according to DNAinfo.

The proposed boundaries span from Bedford to Tompkins avenues and Monroe to Fulton Streets, encompassing 800 buildings, including Queen Anne, Italianate, Romanesque and Renaissance Revival structures and rowhouses.

Four buildings that are already designated as landmarks are within the boundaries, including the Alhambra Apartments on Nostrand Avenue and the Boys’ High School On Marcy Avenue.

The proposed district sits just blocks away from another historic district, the Stuyvesant Heights Historic District, which received approval in 1971 and was extended in 2013.

In the first quarter of this year, Bedford-Stuyvesant was the most active New York City neighborhood for new residential permit applications. [DNAinfo] — Tess Hofmann


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