Here’s a look at 4 reimagined sidewalk sheds: VIDEO

NY Building Congress seeking to replace "unsightly" scaffolding across city

New York /
Dec.December 23, 2015 11:51 AM

If you think sidewalk sheds are becoming more ubiquitous, you’re not wrong.

In the past 12 months alone, a total of 7,446 permits for sidewalk sheds were filed for more than 7,000 buildings across the city. In response, the New York Building Congress launched a competition in June seeking cost-effective designs that could replace unsightly scaffolding.

Last week, the industry group announced four winners, whose designs were a far-cry from the heaps of wood and metal that now hover over more than 200 miles of sidewalk space in New York City.

“The Design Review Committee of fourteen leading industry executives ultimately settled on the four [designs] that best exemplified the goals of the competition of offering practical, cost-effective off-the-shelf designs that are far more attractive than standard sheds,” said Frank Sciame, who heads up an eponymous construction firm and chaired the competition’s committee.

“UrbanArbor” has autumnally-colored beams, which resemble a tree-lined street. Translucent polycarbonate parapets let in more natural light, and solar-powered LED bulbs illuminate the sidewalk at night. The ceiling of the “ScaffoldWing” design is also semitransparent, and angled for effective rainwater drainage.

The “Side+Ways+Shed” positions support beams wrapped in fabric against the building’s walls, granting more room on the sidewalk. The “G-Shed,” too, has LED lighting and, unlike the others, boosts higher shed roofs to allow greater visibility for storefronts. The design shows “modular posts,” replacing complicated bracing systems in favor of a more seamless adaptation.

Whether or not developers are willing to fork out extra cash to use them remains up for debate. A revamped design called “Urban Umbrella” gained some steam back in 2010, but was never adopted by construction companies due to its $150-per-linear-foot price tag.


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Valerie Dillon and Arthur Becker with 465 Washington
After battle with Becker, gallery owner sells Tribeca pad
After battle with Becker, gallery owner sells Tribeca pad
RJBlock Properties' Rodney "RJ Block" Jackson and 2714-2718 Frederick Douglass Boulevard (RJBlock Properties, Apartments.com, Getty Images)
I-sales roundup: RJ Block buys Harlem mixed-use portfolio
I-sales roundup: RJ Block buys Harlem mixed-use portfolio
Larry Silverstein with 120 Broadway
Housing agency nabs two floors at Silverstein’s 120 Broadway
Housing agency nabs two floors at Silverstein’s 120 Broadway
The Ritz-Carlton New York NoMad (The Ritz-Carlton New York, Illustration by Priyanka Modi for The Real Deal with Getty)
How the Ritz-Carlton NoMad avoids violating short-term rental ban
How the Ritz-Carlton NoMad avoids violating short-term rental ban
From left: Gary Barnett, with One Manhattan Square, Harry Macklow with One Wall Street, Steve Witkoff with One High Line, and Miki Naftali with 1045 Madison Avenue (Getty, One Manhattan Square, One Wall Street, Big Architects, The Benson)
Over the glut, but now what? Breaking down NYC’s new condo inventory
Over the glut, but now what? Breaking down NYC’s new condo inventory
Hugh Jackman and 100 Eleventh Avenue #PHA (Getty, StreetEasy)
Hugh Jackman buys penthouse at Jean Nouvel tower
Hugh Jackman buys penthouse at Jean Nouvel tower
The Chetrit Group's Joseph Chetrit and Park West Village on the Upper West Side (Getty Images, Google Maps)
Chetrit, Stellar land $365M refi for UWS luxury apartment complex
Chetrit, Stellar land $365M refi for UWS luxury apartment complex
257-263 West 34th Street and Cornell Realty’s Isaac Hager (Google Maps, Getty)
Isaac Hager seeks bankruptcy for Penn Plaza stake, but Churchill resists
Isaac Hager seeks bankruptcy for Penn Plaza stake, but Churchill resists
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...