Architects win prize for plan to destroy Central Park

The plan calls for a 1,000-foot wall to surround the park

TRD New York /
Mar.March 26, 2016 05:00 PM

In a move sure to offend nearly every New Yorker, an architecture firm just won first place in eVolo Magazine’s 2016 Skyscraper Competition for a plan to dig out Central Park to the bedrock.

The futuristic plan by architects Yitan Sun and Jianshi Wu calls for the complete demolition of the existing Central Park and for the ground to be dug out roughly 1,000 feet, according to Curbed. Then, 1,000-foot-high, 100-foot-thick glass walls would be built around the inside of the hole, rising to street level.

Inside the glass would be thousands upon thousands of luxury apartments – each with a park view.

The designers say that the idea behind the project was to “make Central Park available to more people.”

“With its highly reflective glass cover on all sides, the landscape inside the new park can reach beyond physical boundaries, creating an illusion of infinity. In the heart of New York City, a New Horizon is born.“

It is definitely a cool idea, but it’s probably safe to say that this isn’t happening ever, under any circumstances. [Curbed]Christopher Cameron


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