Your office’s air could be making you sick

And now developers are changing the way they think about air

New York /
Jun.June 05, 2016 11:19 AM

After construction costs, leasing and design, air quality was never even on the radar of most developers. But that has changed in recent years, following evidence that buildings suffer from a buildup of carbon dioxide and other pollutants.

In recent decades, buildings have been constructed to be more airtight, because it makes them more energy efficient. However, builders have often failed to add sufficient ventilation to highly efficient buildings, which leads to a closed system where harmful pollutants build up in the air and are breathed day in and out by workers. It’s know as “sick building syndrome,” according to Newsweek.

Today, some developers and architects are focused on fixing the probem. Architectural firm CookFox designed One Bryant Park, better known as the Bank of America Tower, with special filters that suck out more than 95 percent of the bad air.

The firm is now designing a residential building in Manhattan (the address was not given by Newsweek) that features particle monitors that tell residents whether it’s safe to open their windows.

Other firms are experimenting with volatile organic compound (VOC) sensors. The sensors can decide when to draw in outside air and whether to clean it using high-tech chemical filters. And while technology like this is still relatively uncommon and expensive, mounting evidence connecting air quality and health means that in the future, air will be a primary concern for both developers and tenants.[Newsweek]Christopher Cameron


Related Articles

arrow_forward_ios
Clockwsie from top left: Aby Rosen with 980 Madison Avenue, 258-278 Eighth Avenue, 1 West Street and 511 Lexington Avenue (RFR, JJ Operating, Google Maps)
These were the largest Manhattan real estate loans in July
These were the largest Manhattan real estate loans in July
Lenders are being stingy about granting home equity lines of credit. (iStock)
Home values are up, but just try getting a line of credit
Home values are up, but just try getting a line of credit
Blackstone's Jonathan Gray (Photos via Twitter;iStock/Photo Illustration by Kevin Rebong for The Real Deal)
Blackstone, LBA Logistics get $944M financing for logistics portfolios
Blackstone, LBA Logistics get $944M financing for logistics portfolios
The Grace Building at 1114 Sixth Avenue (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)
Here’s what tenants are paying at Brookfield & Swig’s Grace Building
Here’s what tenants are paying at Brookfield & Swig’s Grace Building
Acting US Attorney for Eastern District of New York Seth DuCharme and Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan (Getty, Twitter, iStock)
Bank of America will pay $300K to settle DOJ mortgage lending discrimination claim
Bank of America will pay $300K to settle DOJ mortgage lending discrimination claim
The Coca-Cola building at 711 Fifth Avenue and Michael Shvo (Credit: Google Maps)
Michael Shvo, partners secure $545M loan for Coca-Cola building
Michael Shvo, partners secure $545M loan for Coca-Cola building
Clockwise from the top left: Jackson Park at 28-40 Jackson Avenue, 240 Willoughby Street in Fort Greene, 664 Pacific Street in Brooklyn, and 247 Metropolitan Avenue in Williamsburg (Credit: StreetEasy, Google Maps, Pacific Park Brooklyn, The Pod Hotel)
These were the top 10 outer-borough loans last month
These were the top 10 outer-borough loans last month
Jackson Park at 28-40 Jackson Avenue and Tishman Speyer's Rob Speyer (Credit: StreetEasy and Tishman Speyer)
Tishman Speyer locks in $1B in financing for Jackson Park
Tishman Speyer locks in $1B in financing for Jackson Park
arrow_forward_ios

The Deal's newsletters give you the latest scoops, fresh headlines, marketing data, and things to know within the industry.

Loading...