Judge orders Aurora, Gottlieb to stop work on parts of Gansevoort Street development

Local advocacy group has filed a lawsuit to stop work on several of the buildings

TRD New York /
Feb.February 10, 2017 10:05 AM

The developers behind the Gansevoort project in the Meatpacking District are barred from doing construction or demolition work on multiple buildings connected to the development, while a lawsuit against them progresses.

New York State Supreme Court Justice Joan Lobis ruled in favor of local advocacy group Save Gansevoort on Thursday, issuing an injunction to stop Aurora Capital Associates and William Gottlieb Real Estate from proceeding with certain types of work on 52-58 Gansevoort Street, Politico reported. The developers are also prevented from making any exterior changes to 60-68 Gansevoort and are barred from doing any work at 70-74 Gansevoort, according to Lobis’ order.

Aurora and William Gottlieb Real Estate are concerned the order will prevent them from completing work on the middle site, where Pastis is slated to open at the end of 2017. Even a delay of three months could cause problems with the restaurant group behind Pastis, lawyers for the developers said, DNA info reported.

The Save Gansevoort group filed a lawsuit against the developers and the Landmarks Preservation Commission last October, seeking to stop what it calls a “massive, out-of-character development.” It is arguing the LPC should not have given approval for the project.

An attorney for the developers, Karen Binder, argued that her client has spent $950,000 to buy an insurance policy that’s required for the development to go forward. She said the injunction would affect the construction work needed to build a stronger foundation for neighboring buildings.

Aurora and William Gottlieb Real Estate are currently redeveloping the Gansevoort Street block as part of a 111,000-square-foot commercial development.

Last month, Hermes signed a lease to open a new, 10,000-square-foot store when the development is completed.

A hearing for the pending lawsuit is scheduled for March 8. [DNAinfo]Miriam Hall


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