London court rules in favor of controversial candy-striped mansion

New York Weekend Edition /
Apr.April 29, 2017 11:00 AM

The denizens of London’s posh Kensington neighborhood consider it so terribly garish, but a judge says the owner of a candy-striped mansion can keep on shocking her neighbors.

The High Court in London ruled that Zipporah Lisle-Mainwaring, a developer who painted her $8.3 million townhouse with red and white stripes, can disregard an order from the local council to cover the pattern, according to the New York Times.

The house has become a symbol for the intolerance among Britain’s ruling class and was featured on the television program called “Posh Neighbors at War.” Lisle-Mainwaring said she painted the house with stripes to “add to the gaiety of the nation.” But neighbors looked at it as a play to get back at them after they fought plans to demolish the house and rebuild it with a two-story basement, a cinema, a 66-foot indoor pool and a spa, according to the Times.

“I thought I would do something to cheer myself up and cheer up the street. I never expected it to become a cause célèbre,” she told the Times, adding that it has nothing to do with revenge and that her neighbors are “pompous idiots.” [NYT] Christopher Cameron

 

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